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Ancient Glass
An Interdisciplinary Exploration

$50.00 ( ) USD

  • Date Published: January 2013
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781139603201
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$ 50.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • This book is an interdisciplinary exploration of archaeological glass in which technological, historical, geological, chemical, and cultural aspects of the study of ancient glass are combined. The book examines why and how this unique material was invented some 4,500 years ago and considers the ritual, social, economic, and political contexts of its development. The book also provides an in-depth consideration of glass as a material, the raw materials used to make it, and its wide range of chemical compositions in both the East and the West from its invention to the seventeenth century AD. Julian Henderson focuses on three contrasting archaeological and scientific case studies: Late Bronze Age glass, late Hellenistic–early Roman glass, and Islamic glass in the Middle East. He considers in detail the provenances of ancient glass using scientific techniques and discusses a range of vessels and their uses in ancient societies.

    • The first volume that brings interdisciplinary studies of ancient glass together
    • A clearly written exposition which provides detailed insights into a broad spectrum of ancient glass studies
    • The first study to consider ancient glass in broad social, economic, and political contexts in the ancient world from c.4000 BC to the 15th century AD using a combination of techniques from the humanities and sciences
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    Customer reviews

    08th Aug 2013 by Adam12345

    Awesome Book

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2013
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781139603201
    • contains: 119 b/w illus. 5 maps 11 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Glass as a material: a technological background in fiaence, pottery and metal?
    2. Ways to flux silica: ashes and minerals
    3. Silica, lime and glass colorants
    4. Glass chemical compositions
    5. Early glass: archaeology
    6. Scientific analysis of early glass
    7. Hellenistic to Roman: a change from small- to large-scale glass production?
    8. Scientific studies of Hellenistic and early Roman glass
    9. Islamic glass: technological continuity and innovation
    10. Chemical analyses of Islamic glasses
    11. The provenance of ancient glass
    12. Conclusions.

  • Author

    Julian Henderson, University of Nottingham
    Julian Henderson is Chair of Archaeological Science in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham. The author of The Science and Archaeology of Materials, he has published more than 200 contributions to books and journals, including in Antiquity, the Journal of Archaeological Science, the Journal of Glass Studies, and the Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectroscopy.

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