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The Limits of Peacekeeping

The Limits of Peacekeeping
Australian Missions in Africa and the Americas, 1992–2005

Volume 4. The Official History of Australian Peacekeeping, Humanitarian and Post-Cold War Operations

$124.00 ( ) USD

  • Date Published: October 2018
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108340090

$ 124.00 USD ( )
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  • The Limits of Peacekeeping highlights the Australian government's peacekeeping efforts in Africa and the Americas from 1992 to 2005. Changing world power structures and increased international cooperation saw a boom in Australia's peacekeeping operations between 1991 and 1995. The initial optimism of this period proved to be misplaced, as the limits of the United Nations and the international community to resolve deep-seated problems became clear. There were also limits on how many missions a middle-sized country like Australia could support. Restricted by the size of the armed forces and financial and geographic constraints, peacekeeping was always a secondary task to ensuring the defence of Australia. Faith in the effectiveness of peacekeeping reduced significantly, and the election of the Howard Coalition Government in 1996 confined peacekeeping missions to the near region from 1996–2001. This volume is an authoritative and compelling history of Australia's changing attitudes towards peacekeeping.

    • This text is an official history of Australia's peacekeeping operations, interweaving details from government files and personal narratives to create a comprehensive and authoritative volume
    • The book is written by leading historians in the field
    • Explores a facet of peacekeeping history not normally examined - the limitations of Australia's policies
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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2018
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108340090
    • contains: 12 b/w illus. 112 colour illus. 17 maps
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Whither the good international citizen? Australia's approach to peacekeeping, 1991–96
    Part I. Somalia:
    2. Towards peace enforcement: Australia responds to the Somalia disaster, 1992
    3. Australian Force Somalia: deploying the 1 RAR Battalion Group, December 1992–January 1993
    4. 'The unforgiving school of trial and error': the 1 RAR Battalion Group in Somalia, January–February 1993
    5. Achieving the mission: Australian civil–military operations in Somalia, April–May 1993
    6. Maintaining a commitment: Australia's role in Unosom II, 1993
    7. 'Our name would not be worth much … if we turned tail': withdrawing from Somalia, 1994–95
    Part II. Rwanda:
    8. 'Somebody do something': the Rwandan genocide and Australia, 1994
    9. After the tempest: the first contingent to Rwanda, August 1994–February 1995
    10. Increasingly unwelcome guests: the second contingent to Rwanda, February–August 1995
    11. Mandate meets reality: Kibeho, April 1995
    Part III. The Keating Government's Last Missions:
    12. A success story in Africa: Australia and the Mozambique elections, 1994
    13. Adrift in Africa: Australian deminers in Mozambique, 1994–2002
    14. One for the alliance: the commitment to Haiti, 1994–95
    15. To the Caribbean: Australian police operations in Haiti, 1994–95
    Part IV. The Howard Government's Missions:
    16. Defining the national interest: the Howard Government and peacekeeping, 1996–2001
    17. Universal peacekeepers? Guatemala, 1997
    18. 'Backing a winner': Australia and the UN mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea, 2001–05
    19. 'Two guys can, and do, make a difference': Australian advisers in Sierra Leone, 2001–03.

  • Editors

    Jean Bou, Australian National University, Canberra
    Jean Bou is a senior lecturer at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. He is the author, co-author or editor of ten books on Australian military history.

    Bob Breen, Deakin University, Victoria
    Bob Breen is the Director of Professional Practice Qualifications at Deakin University, Victoria, and a Visiting Fellow at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. He is also the author of Volume V of this series, The Good Neighbour (Cambridge, 2016).

    David Horner, Australian National University, Canberra
    David Horner, AM, FASSA, is an emeritus professor in the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University, where he was previously professor of Australian defence history. He is the Official Historian of Australian Peacekeeping, Humanitarian and Post-Cold War Operations.

    Garth Pratten, Australian National University, Canberra
    Garth Pratten is a Senior Lecturer in Military Operations in the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. He is the author or co-author of several books on Australia's military history.

    Miesje de Vogel, Australian War Memorial

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