Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Salt Production and Social Hierarchy in Ancient China
An Archaeological Investigation of Specialization in China's Three Gorges

$47.99 (C)

  • Date Published: March 2014
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107629936

$ 47.99 (C)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This book examines the organization of specialized salt production at Zhongba, one of the most important prehistoric sites in the Three Gorges of China's Yangzi River valley. Rowan K. Flad demonstrates that salt production emerged in the second millennium BCE and developed into a large-scale, intense activity. As the intensity of this activity increased during the early Bronze Age, production became more coordinated, perhaps by an emergent elite who appear to have supported their position of authority by means of divination and the control of ritual knowledge. This study explores evidence of these changes in ceramics, the layout of space at the site, and animal remains. It synthesizes the data retrieved from years of excavation, showing not only the evolution of production methods, but also the emergence of social hierarchy in the Three Gorges region over two millennia.

    • Relates to the Three Gorges of China, a region of international interest because of the recently constructed dam
    • Salt is a vital resource for all human societies and this study helps us understand how early populations acquired it
    • Contains a personal account of a foreign archaeologist working in China
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "Flad’s insightful study, including a thoughtful review of ethnohistoric data and material remains from other areas of the ancient world where salt was produced, will be an inspiration for other research projects on salt production." -Anne P. Underhill, Current Anthropology

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2014
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107629936
    • length: 312 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 17 mm
    • weight: 0.42kg
    • contains: 71 b/w illus. 2 maps 15 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction
    2. The organization of ancient salt production in Sichuan
    3. Ancient salt production in Sichuan
    4. The Zhongba site
    5. Ceramic evidence
    6. Parameters of production according to ceramics
    7. Features and spatiality
    8. Animal remains and divination
    9. Conclusions and implications
    Epilogue.

  • Author

    Rowan K. Flad, Harvard University, Massachusetts
    Rowan K. Flad is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University. He is actively engaged in archaeological field work in China and has lectured widely on Chinese archaeology. He co-edited a book on specialization in the series Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association and has contributed articles to many edited volumes and journals including Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Current Anthropology, the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology and the Journal of Field Archaeology.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×