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Agriculture and the Onset of Political Inequality before the Inka

Agriculture and the Onset of Political Inequality before the Inka

Out of Print

Part of New Studies in Archaeology

  • Date Published: January 1993
  • availability: Unavailable - out of print September 1998
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521402729

Out of Print
Hardback

Unavailable - out of print September 1998
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About the Authors
  • Archaeologists have long been interested in the onset of political differentiation, and how this can be inferred from the archaeological record. Here Christine Hastorf looks at the nature of power and political diversity in the Andean region of central Peru over a thousand-year period, from AD 200 until the fifteenth-century Inka conquest. She argues that no single model or theory can usefully explain all social change, and that archaeologists should instead focus on a particular region to understand the context of change and why it occurred. She looks at political inequality from a number of different perspectives and suggests a series of 'cultural' principles that shaped political developments. She also traces changes in agricultural production, seeing them as contributing to social and political evolution in the region.

    • An important and innovative work on political changes within prehistoric central American civilization; it will be of interest to students of Andean culture and to those concerned with the development of complex societies
    • An internationally known young scholar with a deservedly strong reputation, Dr Hastorf's book is well organized and she presents carefully analysed and tightly controlled archaeological data from the area
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '… excellent work … belongs on the bookshelf of any scholar interested in political, social and economic change, and how the archaeological record informs these interrelated, but disinctive, processes.' Antiquity

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 1993
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521402729
    • length: 314 pages
    • dimensions: 254 x 180 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.817kg
    • contains: 31 b/w illus. 31 tables
    • availability: Unavailable - out of print September 1998
  • Table of Contents

    List of illustrations
    List of tables
    Acknowledgments
    1. Introduction: politics, agriculture, and inequality
    Part I. Political Inequality and Economics:
    2. The onset of political inequality
    3. The economics of intensive Andean agriculture
    Part II. Socio-Political Change in the Mantaro Region:
    4. Sausa cultural setting of the region
    5. Upper Mantaro archaeological site and settlement data
    6. Regional socio-political structures: Wanka II hierarchical developments
    Part III. Agricultural Production in the Mantaro Region:
    7. The regional environment and its crops
    8. Defining modern land-use zones
    9. Pre-Hispanic agricultural methods and cropping patterns
    10. Pre-Hispanic production potentials
    11. Palaeoethnobotanical data, agricultural production, and food
    Part IV. The Negotiation Of Andean Agriculture in Political Change:
    12. Analysis of change in agricultural production
    13. Defending the heights
    Appendices
    References cited.

  • Author

    Christine A. Hastorf, University of California, Berkeley

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