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Landscape, Monuments and Society
The Prehistory of Cranborne Chase

$38.00 ( ) USD

John C. Barrett, Richard Bradley, Mark Bowden, Roy Entwistle, Peter Fisher, Martin Jones, A. J. Legge, Mark Robinson, Julie Gardiner, Rosamund Cleal, A. J. Legge, Martin Green, Andrew Brown, Mark Bowden, Barry Lewis, Juliet Rogers, Mark Bowden, S. Butcher, Brendan O'Connor, Martin Jones, Jameson Wooders, Martin Green, Brendan O'Connor, Mark Corney
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  • Date Published: April 2011
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511870972

$ 38.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • Cranborne Chase, in central southern England, is the area where British field archaeology developed in its modern form. The site of General Pitt Rivers' pioneering excavations in the nineteenth century, Cranborne Chase also provides a microcosm of virtually all the major types of filed monument present in southern England as a whole. Much of the archaeological material has fortuitously survived, offering the fullest chronological cover of any part of the prehistoric British landscape. Martin Green began working in this region in 1968 and was joined by John Barrett and Richard Bradley in 1977 for a fuller programme of survey and excavation that lasted for nearly ten years. In this important study, they apply some of the questions in prehistory to one of the first regions of the country to be studied in such detail. The book is a regional study of long-term change in British prehistory, and contains a unique collection of data. A landmark in the archaeological literature, it will be essential reading for students and scholars of British prehistory and social and historical geography, and also for all those involved with archaeological methods.

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2011
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511870972
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Time and Place:
    1. The archaeology of social reproduction John C. Barrett
    2. The study area Richard Bradley
    3. The development of fieldwork in the study area Richard Bradley
    4. The development of the landscape in the study area Richard Bradley, Mark Bowden, Roy Entwistle, Peter Fisher, Martin Jones, A. J. Legge and Mark Robinson
    Part II. The Earlier Neolithic:
    1. Introduction Richard Bradley
    2. The nature of the evidence Richard Bradley and Julie Gardiner
    3. The Mesolithic background Richard Bradley
    4. The Earlier Neolithic: the evidence of domestic activity Julie Gardiner, Rosamund Cleal and Richard Bradley
    5. The evidence of earthwork monuments Richard Bradley
    Part III. The Later Neolithic:
    1. Introduction Richard Bradley
    2. The evidence of domestic activity Richard Bradley, Rosamund Cleal, Julie Gardiner, A. J. Legge, Martin Green, Andrew Brown, Mark Bowden and Barry Lewis
    Part IV. The Early Bronze Age:
    1. Introduction John C. Barrett and Richard Bradley
    2. The artefact sequences John C. Barrett, Julie Gardiner, Rosamund Cleal, Brendan O'Connor and Richard Bradley
    Part IV. The Early Bronze Age:
    1 Introduction John C. Barrett and Richard Bradley
    2. The artefact sequences John C. Barrett, Julie Gardiner, Rosamund Cleal, Brendan O'Connor, Richard Bradley, Martin Green, A. J. Legge and Juliet Rogers
    Part V. The Middle Bronze Age:
    1. Introduction John C. Barrett
    2. The excavations: South Lodge enclosure, cemetery and field system John C. Bradley, Richard Bradley, Juliet Rogers, Mark Bowden, S. Butcher, Brendan O'Connor, A. J. Legge, Martin Jones, Jameson Wooders and Martin Green
    Part VI. The Late Bronze Age and Iron Age:
    1. Introduction John C. Barrett
    2. Chronology John C. Barrett and Brendan O'Connor
    3. Later first millennium settlement morphology Mark Corney
    4. Synthesis John C. Barrett and Mark Corney
    References
    Index.

  • Editors

    John Barrett, University of Sheffield

    Richard J. Bradley

    Martin T. Green

    Contributors

    John C. Barrett, Richard Bradley, Mark Bowden, Roy Entwistle, Peter Fisher, Martin Jones, A. J. Legge, Mark Robinson, Julie Gardiner, Rosamund Cleal, A. J. Legge, Martin Green, Andrew Brown, Mark Bowden, Barry Lewis, Juliet Rogers, Mark Bowden, S. Butcher, Brendan O'Connor, Martin Jones, Jameson Wooders, Martin Green, Brendan O'Connor, Mark Corney

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