Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

The Cambridge Companion to Theatre History

$108.00 (P)

Part of Cambridge Companions to Literature

David Wiles, Stefan Hulfeld, Christopher Baugh, Erika Fischer-Lichte, Ros Merkin, S. E. Wilmer, Hazem Azmy, Diego Pellecchia, Marvin Carlson, Willmar Sauter, Josette Féral, Zachary Dunbar, Marius Kwint, Thomas Postlewait, Barbara Hodgdon, Fiona Macintosh, Gilli Bush-Bailey, Jacky Bratton, Grant Tyler Peterson
View all contributors
  • Date Published: January 2013
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521766364

$ 108.00 (P)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Scholars, amateur historians and actors have shaped theatre history in different ways at different times and in different places. This Companion offers students and general readers a series of accessible and engaging essays on the key aspects of studying and writing theatre history. The diverse international team of contributors investigates how theatre history has been constructed, showing how historical facts are tied to political and artistic agendas and explaining why history matters to us. Beginning with an introduction to the central narrative that traditionally informs our understanding of what theatre is, the book then turns to alternative points of view – from other parts of the world and from the perspective of performers in fields such as music-theatre and circus. It concludes by looking at how history is written in the 'democratic' age of the Internet and offers a new perspective on theatre history in our globalised world.

    • Offers a commentary on the writing of theatre history with an accessible twenty-first-century approach that does not assume specific areas of prior knowledge but does not dumb down the subject
    • Balances global and mainstream perspectives and will make sense to those engaged with interculturalism and globalisation - issues that may be seen as currently prevailing in the theatre and performance studies world
    • Explains why theatre history matters and will appeal to those drawn to argument and debate
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "Seasoned scholars and students alike will find much of value in this diverse collection. Highly recommended."
    J. Fisher, Choice

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2013
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521766364
    • length: 340 pages
    • dimensions: 231 x 152 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.66kg
    • contains: 36 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: why?
    1. Why theatre history? David Wiles
    Part I. When?: Indicative Timeline:
    2. Modernist theatre Stefan Hulfeld
    3. Baroque to romantic theatre Christopher Baugh
    4. Medieval, renaissance and early modern theatre David Wiles
    5. Classical theatre Erika Fischer-Lichte
    Part II. Where?:
    6. Liverpool Ros Merkin
    7. Finland S. E. Wilmer
    8. Egypt Hazem Azmy
    9. Traditional theatre: the case of Japanese Noh Diego Pellecchia
    10. Reflections on a global theatre history Marvin Carlson
    Part III. What?:
    11. The audience Willmar Sauter
    12. The art of acting Josette Féral
    13. Music theatre and musical theatre Zachary Dunbar
    14. Circus Marius Kwint
    Part IV. How?:
    15. The nature of historical evidence: a case study Thomas Postlewait
    16. The visual record: the case of Hamlet Barbara Hodgdon
    17. Museums, archives and collecting Fiona Macintosh
    18. Re:enactment Gilli Bush-Bailey
    19. The internet: history 2.0? Jacky Bratton and Grant Tyler Peterson.

  • Instructors have used or reviewed this title for the following courses

    • History of the Theatre 2
    • Theatre History: Origins to 1660
    • Theatre and Society
  • Editors

    David Wiles, Royal Holloway, University of London
    David Wiles is Professor of Theatre at Royal Holloway, University of London. He has published nine books, including Tragedy in Athens: Performance Space and Theatrical Meaning (1997), Greek Theatre Performance (2000), A Short History of Western Performance Space (2003) and Theatre and Citizenship: The History of a Practice (2010). His major areas of historical interest are Elizabethan and Greek theatre and his special interest in the theatre mask culminated in the publication of Mask and Performance in Greek Tragedy in 2007. His Greek Theatre Performance (2000) has been widely used by undergraduates. He has been shortlisted for Runciman, Criticos and STR prizes. He currently convenes the theatre historiography working group for the International Federation for Theatre Research.

    Christine Dymkowski, Royal Holloway, University of London
    Christine Dymkowski is Professor of Drama and Theatre History at Royal Holloway, University of London. She has a special interest in Edwardian theatre, feminist/women's theatre and the history of Shakespeare production within its wider cultural contexts. Co-founder of the working group on Feminist Theatre/Women in Theatre for the International Federation for Theatre Research, she has written numerous articles and papers on Lena Ashwell, Edith Craig, Cicely Hamilton, Susan Glaspell, Caryl Churchill, Sarah Daniels and Timberlake Wertenbaker. Her work on Shakespeare includes Harley Granville Barker: A Preface to Modern Shakespeare (1986); The Tempest in the Cambridge University Press Shakespeare in Production series (2000); 'Ancient [and Modern] Gower: Presenting Shakespeare's Pericles', in P. Butterworth (ed.), The Narrator, the Expositor and the Prompter in European Medieval Theatre (2007); and 'Measure for Measure: Shakespeare's twentieth-century play', in Shakespeare in Stages, which she co-edited with Christie Carson (Cambridge University Press, 2010). She is also Theatre History editor of the forthcoming New Variorum Tempest.

    Contributors

    David Wiles, Stefan Hulfeld, Christopher Baugh, Erika Fischer-Lichte, Ros Merkin, S. E. Wilmer, Hazem Azmy, Diego Pellecchia, Marvin Carlson, Willmar Sauter, Josette Féral, Zachary Dunbar, Marius Kwint, Thomas Postlewait, Barbara Hodgdon, Fiona Macintosh, Gilli Bush-Bailey, Jacky Bratton, Grant Tyler Peterson

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×