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The Art of Sculpture in Fifteenth-Century Italy

The Art of Sculpture in Fifteenth-Century Italy

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Amy R. Bloch, Daniel M. Zolli, Una Roman D'Elia, Frank Fehrenbach, Katherine Kupiec, Peter Jonathan Bell, Ashley Elston, Megan Holmes, David J. Grogin, Robert Glass, Sarah Blake McHam, Adrian Randolph, Morgan Ng, Lorenzo G. Buonanno, Yvonne Elet, Lauren Jacobi, Henrike Lange, Michael J. Waters, Joost Keizer
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  • Publication planned for: February 2020
  • availability: Not yet published - available from February 2020
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108428842

c.$ 99.99 ( )
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  • Fifteenth-century Italy witnessed sweeping innovations in the art of sculpture. Sculptors rediscovered new types of images from classical antiquity and invented new ones, devised novel ways to finish surfaces, and pushed the limits of their materials to new expressive extremes. The Art of Sculpture in Fifteenth-Century Italy surveys the sculptural production created by a range of artists throughout the peninsula. It offers a comprehensive overview of Italian sculpture during a century of intense creativity and development. Here, nineteen historians of Quattrocento Italian sculpture chart the many competing forces that led makers, patrons, and viewers to invest sculpture with such heightened importance in this time and place. Methodologically wide-ranging, the essays, specially commissioned for this volume, explore the vast range of techniques and media (stone, metal, wood, terracotta, and stucco) used to fashion works of sculpture. They also examine how viewers encountered those objects, discuss varying approaches to narrative, and ponder the increasing contemporary interest in the relationship between sculpture and history.

    • Offers a complete account of fifteenth-century Italian sculpture, especially in its introduction, which surveys the century's sculpture tout court
    • Essays cover a wide array of media and focus on a range of artists active throughout the Italian peninsula, from the canonical (e.g. Donatello and Luca della Robbia) to the less well-known (e.g. Bartolomeo Bellano and Antonio Rizzo)
    • Illuminates sculpture from traditional 'centers' of art-historical scholarship (e.g. Florence, Venice, Rome), while also alerting readers to less well-studied arenas of sculptural production (e.g. Milan, Naples)
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: February 2020
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108428842
    • dimensions: 279 x 216 mm
    • availability: Not yet published - available from February 2020
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction – making and unmaking sculpture in fifteenth-century Italy Amy R. Bloch and Daniel M. Zolli
    Part I. Surface Effects:
    1. The color of white in fifteenth-century Tuscan sculpture Una Roman D'Elia
    2. The colors of monochrome sculpture Frank Fehrenbach
    3. New light on Luca della Robbia's glazes Catherine Kupiec
    Part II. Sculptural Bodies:
    4. Donatello, Alberti, and the free-standing statue in fifteenth-century Florence Peter Jonathan Bell
    5. Complicating matters Ashley Elston
    6. Sculptural transformations in Quattrocento Italy Megan Holmes
    Part III. Sculptural Norms, Made and Unmade:
    7. The body, space, and narrative in Central and Northern Italian sculpture David J. Grogin
    8. Rethinking style in fifteenth-century Italian sculpture Robert Glass
    9. Bellano's invention at the Santo Sarah Blake McHam
    Part IV. Sculpture as Performance:
    10. Sculpture and sacrifice Adrian Randolph
    11. Performative light Morgan Ng
    12. Tullio Lombardo, Antonio Rizzo, and sculptural audacity in Renaissance Venice Lorenzo G. Buonanno
    Part V. Sculpture in the Expanded World:
    13. Substance and surface Yvonne Elet
    14. Conjoining economy and ritual Lauren Jacobi
    15. Solidified saints Henrike Lange
    16. Candelabra-columns and the Lombard architecture of sculptural assemblage Michael J. Waters
    Part VI. Sculpture and history:
    17. Jacopo della Quercia's Fonte Gaia Amy R. Bloch
    18. Virgil's forge Daniel M. Zolli
    19. Trust in sculpture Joost Keizer.

  • Editors

    Amy R. Bloch, State University of New York, Albany
    Amy R. Bloch is associate professor of art history at the State University of New York, Albany and author of Lorenzo Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise: Humanism, History, and Artistic Philosophy in the Italian Renaissance (Cambridge, 2016). Her work has been supported by fellowships and grants from the Villa I Tatti (the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies), the Renaissance Society of America, and the College Art Association.

    Daniel M. Zolli, Pennsylvania State University
    Daniel M. Zolli is a scholar of early modern art and an assistant professor at The Pennsylvania State University. In 2015, he co-curated Sculpture in the Age of Donatello at the Museum of Biblical Art for which the accompanying catalogue was a finalist for the Alfred H. Barr Award of the College Art Association.

    Contributors

    Amy R. Bloch, Daniel M. Zolli, Una Roman D'Elia, Frank Fehrenbach, Katherine Kupiec, Peter Jonathan Bell, Ashley Elston, Megan Holmes, David J. Grogin, Robert Glass, Sarah Blake McHam, Adrian Randolph, Morgan Ng, Lorenzo G. Buonanno, Yvonne Elet, Lauren Jacobi, Henrike Lange, Michael J. Waters, Joost Keizer

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