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The Demography of Roman Italy
Population Dynamics in an Ancient Conquest Society 201 BCE–14 CE

$137.00 (C)

  • Author: Saskia Hin, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
  • Date Published: March 2013
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107003934

$ 137.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • This book provides a fresh perspective on the population history of Italy during the late Republic. It employs a range of sources and a multidisciplinary approach to investigate demographic trends and the demographic behaviour of Roman citizens. Dr Hin shows how they adapted to changing economic, climatic and social conditions in a period of intense conquest. Her critical evaluation of the evidence on the demographic toll taken by warfare and rising societal complexity leads her to a revisionist 'middle count' scenario of population development in Italy. In tracing the population history of an ancient conquest society, she provides an accessible pathway into Roman demography which focuses on the three main demographic parameters – mortality, fertility and migration. She unites literary and epigraphic sources with demographic theory, archaeological surveys, climatic and skeletal evidence, models and comparative data. Tables, figures and maps enable readers to visualise the quantitative dynamics at work.

    • An all-encompassing, comparative approach to Roman demographic history
    • The first study of the emerging Roman Empire to discuss the impact of climate change on Roman demography
    • Will appeal both to specialists in ancient history and to demographers and other social scientists with historical interests
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "Short summary cannot do justice to the importance of this contribution, which advances our understanding on a number of fronts. The Demography of Roman Italy is a major contribution, as impressive in its handling of the ancient sources as of the tools of historical demography. Its achievement lies in its sophisticated and cautious approach to both the dynamics of the Roman population and the large-scale trajectory of Roman development."
    Kyle Harper, The Journal of Roman Studies

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2013
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107003934
    • length: 422 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.73kg
    • contains: 19 b/w illus. 3 maps 22 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Economic and Ecological Parameters:
    1. Introduction
    2. Framing the economic setting: structure and development
    3. Climate and climatic change
    Part II. The Demographic Parameters: Mortality, Fertility and Migration:
    4. Mortality
    5. Fertility
    6. Migration
    Part III. Population Size:
    7. Counting Romans
    8. Archaeology and population: demography from potsherds? 9. Summary and conclusion
    Appendix 1
    Appendix 2.

  • Author

    Saskia Hin, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
    Saskia Hin is a Researcher at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

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