Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Eusebius and Empire
Constructing Church and Rome in the Ecclesiastical History

$125.00 (C)

  • Date Published: February 2019
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108474078
Average user rating
(1 review)

$ 125.00 (C)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History, written in the early fourth century, continues to serve as our primary gateway to a crucial three hundred year period: the rise of early Christianity under the Roman Empire. In this volume, James Corke-Webster undertakes the first systematic study considering the History in the light of its fourth-century circumstances as well as its author's personal history, intellectual commitments, and literary abilities. He argues that the Ecclesiastical History is not simply an attempt to record the past history of Christianity, but a sophisticated mission statement that uses events and individuals from that past to mould a new vision of Christianity tailored to Eusebius' fourth-century context. He presents elite Graeco-Roman Christians with a picture of their faith that smooths off its rough edges and misrepresents its size, extent, nature, and relationship to Rome. Ultimately, Eusebius suggests that Christianity was - and always had been - the Empire's natural heir.

    • Presents a radical new reading of our main narrative source for early Christianity
    • Explores how Christian history was rewritten in the fourth century to suit its changing circumstances in the Roman Empire
    • Fundamentally re-assesses our view of the literary ability of Eusebius and so makes an important contribution to the study of early fourth-century literary culture
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    21st May 2019 by Iuliu

    Linked with the destiny of his author, this book is an important contribution to the investigation of Church history and it will be for sure useful not only for the Christian thinkers, but also for historians and for all the readers who want to find more about the way how Christianity changed the world. Extract from: Iuliu-Marius Morariu, James Corke-Webster, Eusebius and Empire. Constructing Church and Rome in the Ecclesiastical History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2019, 345 pp., in Anuario de Historia de la Iglesia, vol. 28, Navarra, 2019, pp. 530-531.

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108474078
    • length: 360 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.64kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I:
    1. Eusebius, of Caesarea
    2. The Ecclesiastical History
    Part II:
    3. Christian intellectuals
    4. Christian ascetics
    5. Christian families
    6. Christian martyrs
    Part III:
    7. The Church
    8. The Church and Rome.

  • Author

    James Corke-Webster, King's College London
    James Corke-Webster is Lecturer in Roman History at King's College London. His work focuses on early Christian and late antique history and literature. As well as a series of articles on Eusebius, he has published on early Christian experience under Rome - in particular the Pliny–Trajan correspondence on the Christians - martyr literature, apologetic writings, and early hagiography.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×