Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist

Law and Power in the Making of the Roman Commonwealth

$107.00 (C)

  • Date Published: November 2014
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107071971

$ 107.00 (C)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • With a broad chronological sweep, this book provides an historical account of Roman law and legal institutions which explains how they were created and modified in relation to political developments and changes in power relations. It underlines the constant tension between two central aspects of Roman politics: the aristocratic nature of the system of government, and the drive for increased popular participation in decision-making and the exercise of power. The traditional balance of power underwent a radical transformation under Augustus, with new processes of integration and social mobility brought into play. Professor Capogrossi Colognesi brings into sharp relief the deeply political nature of the role of Roman juridical science as an expression of aristocratic politics and discusses the imperial jurists' fundamental contribution to the production of an outline theory of sovereignty and legality which would constitute, together with Justinian's gathering of Roman legal knowledge, the most substantial legacy of Rome.

    • Provides a comprehensive treatment of the relationship between law and politics throughout Roman history
    • Demonstrates the central role of the legal system in shaping the political institutions of Rome
    • Proves that the extraordinary success of ancient Rome was due not to military power alone, but also to an articulated system of legal rules which provided a degree of integration of the conquered peoples into their system
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2014
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107071971
    • length: 402 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 26 mm
    • weight: 0.7kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. The genesis of a political community
    2. Early Roman institutions
    3. The Etruscans
    4. From Monarchy to Republic
    5. Rome's Republican institutions
    6. Toward Italian hegemony
    7. An aristocracy of government
    8. The evolution of Roman law and jurisprudence
    9. Rome's Mediterranean hegemony: new horizons in the third century BC
    10. The reforms of the Gracchi and the crisis of the Roman ruling class
    11. Sulla's attempted restoration and the twilight of the Republic
    12. Civil war
    13. Augustus: the construction of a new institutional system
    14. The architecture of governance
    15. The imperial order at its height
    16. An empire of cities
    17. The emperor and the law
    18. The conclusion of a long journey.

  • Author

    Luigi Capogrossi Colognesi, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy
    Luigi Capogrossi Colognesi served as Professor of Roman Law at the Universities of Macerata and Pisa from 1971, and at the University of Rome 'La Sapienza' from 1981, where he is now Professor Emeritus. He has an international reputation in many areas of research including the history of property law, the history of Roman agrarian institutions and economics, and the history of social sciences in the nineteenth century, with particular reference to Max Weber's thinking on ancient history.

    Translator

    Laura Kopp

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×