Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

The Punic Mediterranean
Identities and Identification from Phoenician Settlement to Roman Rule

$142.00 (C)

Part of British School at Rome Studies

Josephine Crawley Quinn, Nicholas C. Vella, Jonathan R. W. Prag, Peter van Dommelen, Sandro Filippo Bondì, Carlos Gómez Bellard, Suzanne Frey-Kupper, Boutheina Maraoui Telmini, Roald Docter, Babette Bechtold, Fethi Chelbi, Winfred van de Put, Habib Ben Younès, Alia Krandel-Ben Younès, Virginie Bridoux, Emanuele Papi, Alicia Jiménez, Carmen Aranegui Gascó, Jaime Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez, Andrea Roppa, Corinne Bonnet, Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
View all contributors
  • Date Published: February 2015
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107055278

$ 142.00 (C)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The role of the Phoenicians in the economy, culture and politics of the ancient Mediterranean was as large as that of the Greeks and Romans, and deeply interconnected with that 'classical' world, but their lack of literature and their oriental associations mean that they are much less well-known. This book brings state-of-the-art international scholarship on Phoenician and Punic studies to an English-speaking audience, collecting new papers from fifteen leading voices in the field from Europe and North Africa, with a bias towards the younger generation. Focusing on a series of case-studies from the colonial world of the western Mediterranean, it asks what 'Phoenician' and 'Punic' actually mean, how Punic or western Phoenician identity has been constructed by ancients and moderns, and whether there was in fact a 'Punic world'.

    • A host of leading international scholars tests ancient and modern definitions of 'Phoenician' and 'Punic' against case studies, thereby integrating theory with practice
    • Combines the use of archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and literary sources
    • Brings out the diverse nature of areas hitherto subsumed under the generic label 'Punic' and so gives an insight into the complexities of western Mediterranean history in antiquity
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "This stimulating, informative, and timely volume advances our understanding of the Phoenicians’ place in the western Mediterranean, and reminds us that the Greeks and Romans should not be thought of as the only owners of the "Classical" past."
    Carolina López-Ruiz, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    '… the work coordinated by Quinn and Vella contributes brilliantly to the deconstruction and reformulation of ‘Punic’ (and ‘Phoenician’) identities through concepts - heterogeneity, connectivity, fluidity, negotiation, local agency and hybridism.' Manuel Álvarez Martí-Aguilar, Antiquity

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2015
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107055278
    • length: 414 pages
    • dimensions: 244 x 170 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.98kg
    • contains: 75 b/w illus. 24 colour illus. 22 maps 4 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Josephine Crawley Quinn and Nicholas C. Vella
    Part I. Contexts:
    1. Phoinix and Poenus: usage in antiquity Jonathan R. W. Prag
    2. The invention of the Phoenicians Nicholas C. Vella
    3. Punic identities and modern perceptions in the western Mediterranean Peter van Dommelen
    4. Phoenicity, Punicities Sandro Filippo Bondì
    5. Death among the Punics Carlos Gómez Bellard
    6. Coins and their use in the Punic Mediterranean Suzanne Frey-Kupper
    Part II. Case Studies:
    7. Defining Punic Carthage Boutheina Maraoui Telmini, Roald Docter, Babette Bechtold, Fethi Chelbi and Winfred van de Put
    8. Punic identity in North Africa: the funerary world Habib Ben Younès and Alia Krandel-Ben Younès
    9. A Carthaginian perspective on the altars of the Philaeni Josephine Crawley Quinn
    10. Numidia and the Punic world Virginie Bridoux
    11. Punic Mauretania? Emanuele Papi
    12. Punic after Punic times? The case of the so-called 'Libyphoenician' coins of southern Iberia Alicia Jiménez
    13. More than neighbours: Punic-Iberian connections in southeast Iberia Carmen Aranegui Gascó and Jaime Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez
    14. Identifying Punic Sardinia: local communities and cultural identities Andrea Roppa
    15. Phoenician identities in Hellenistic times: strategies and negotiations Corinne Bonnet
    Afterword Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

  • Editors

    Josephine Crawley Quinn, University of Oxford
    Josephine Crawley Quinn is University Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Oxford and a Fellow and Tutor of Worcester College, and works on Mediterranean history and archaeology. She has a particular interest in ancient North Africa, but has published articles on topics from Roman imperialism to Athenian sculpture to Carthaginian child sacrifice to Edwardian education, and she co-edited another volume of essays on The Hellenistic West (with Jonathan Prag, Cambridge, 2013). She co-directs, with Andrew Wilson and Elizabeth Fentress, the excavations at Utica (Tunisia) as well as, with Jonathan Prag, the Oxford Centre for Phoenician and Punic Studies. She is currently writing a book on Phoenicianism from Homer to the Arab Spring.

    Nicholas C. Vella, University of Malta
    Nicholas C. Vella is Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of Classics and Archaeology at the University of Malta. His research interests are varied and include the historiography of antiquarianism and archaeological practice in the Mediterranean, later Mediterranean prehistory, and Phoenician and Punic ritual practices. He has co-edited Debating Orientalization (2006) with Corinna Riva, and has recently published another collection of essays on the Maltese Bronze Age with Davide Tanasi. He supervised the University of Malta excavations at the Phoenician sanctuary site of Tas-Silġ in Malta between 1996 and 2005, and has co-edited the final report that is forthcoming with Peeters (Leuven). He co-directed the excavations of a small Punic shrine in Gozo (Malta) between 2005 and 2010, and is co-director of a field-walking project in Malta.

    Contributors

    Josephine Crawley Quinn, Nicholas C. Vella, Jonathan R. W. Prag, Peter van Dommelen, Sandro Filippo Bondì, Carlos Gómez Bellard, Suzanne Frey-Kupper, Boutheina Maraoui Telmini, Roald Docter, Babette Bechtold, Fethi Chelbi, Winfred van de Put, Habib Ben Younès, Alia Krandel-Ben Younès, Virginie Bridoux, Emanuele Papi, Alicia Jiménez, Carmen Aranegui Gascó, Jaime Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez, Andrea Roppa, Corinne Bonnet, Andrew Wallace-Hadrill

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×