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Interpreting Proclus
From Antiquity to the Renaissance

$34.99 (C)

Stephen Gersh, Lucas Siorvanes, Anne Sheppard, John M. Dillon, Cristina d'Ancona, Dominic J. O'Meara, Michele Trizio, Lela Alexidze, Carlos Steel, Pasquale Porro, Markus Führer, Michael J. B. Allen, Thomas Leinkauf
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  • Date Published: July 2018
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108465359

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About the Authors
  • This is the first book to provide an account of the influence of Proclus, a member of the Athenian Neoplatonic School, during more than one thousand years of European history (c.500–1600). Proclus was the most important philosopher of late antiquity, a dominant (albeit controversial) voice in Byzantine thought, the second most influential Greek philosopher in the later western Middle Ages (after Aristotle), and a major figure (together with Plotinus) in the revival of Greek philosophy in the Renaissance. Proclus was also intensively studied in the Islamic world of the Middle Ages and was a major influence on the thought of medieval Georgia. The volume begins with a substantial essay by the editor summarizing the entire history of Proclus' reception. This is followed by the essays of more than a dozen of the world's leading authorities in the various specific areas covered.

    • The first systematic history of the reception of one of antiquity's most important philosophers
    • Ranges over a thousand years of history and across Europe and the Middle East
    • Discusses for the first time in English many topics which have previously only been treated in other languages
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "… an immensely learned compilation of studies of major (and some very minor) acts of appropriation or, to use Gersh’s own word, of the "assimilation" of Procline Platonism."
    Lloyd Gerson, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    'This collective effort succeeds in making the strongest possible case for the grand narrative of over one thousand years of Proclus’s influence in the West and East; and many of the highlighted essays are significant contributions to the scholarly literature in their own fields.' Daniel O’Connell, Journal of the History of Philosophy

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2018
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108465359
    • length: 419 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.56kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    One thousand years of Proclus: an introduction to his reception Stephen Gersh
    1. Proclus' life, works, and education of the soul Lucas Siorvanes
    2. Proclus as exegete Anne Sheppard
    3. Proclus as theologian Stephen Gersh
    4. 'Dionysius the Areopagite' John M. Dillon
    5. The Book of Causes Cristina d'Ancona
    6. Michael Psellos Dominic J. O'Meara
    7. Eleventh- to twelfth-century Byzantium Michele Trizio
    8. Ioane Petritsi Lela Alexidze
    9. William of Moerbeke, translator of Proclus Carlos Steel
    10. The University of Paris in the thirteenth century Pasquale Porro
    11. Dietrich of Freiberg and Berthold of Moosburg Markus Führer and Stephen Gersh
    12. Nicholas of Cusa Stephen Gersh
    13. Marsilio Ficino Michael J. B. Allen
    14. Francesco Patrizi da Cherso Thomas Leinkauf.

  • Editor

    Stephen Gersh, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
    Stephen Gersh is Professor of Medieval Studies and Concurrent Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. Specializing in the Platonic tradition, he is the author of numerous monographs on ancient, medieval, and modern philosophy of which the most recent are Reading Plato, Tracing Plato (2005); Neoplatonism after Derrida: Parallelograms (2006); and Being Different: More Neoplatonism after Derrida (2014). He has edited, among other books, Medieval and Renaissance Humanism: Realism, Representation, and Reform (with Bert Roest, 2003) and Eriugena, Berkeley, and the Idealist Tradition (with Dermot Moran, 2006).

    Contributors

    Stephen Gersh, Lucas Siorvanes, Anne Sheppard, John M. Dillon, Cristina d'Ancona, Dominic J. O'Meara, Michele Trizio, Lela Alexidze, Carlos Steel, Pasquale Porro, Markus Führer, Michael J. B. Allen, Thomas Leinkauf

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