Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist

The Roman Villa in the Mediterranean Basin
Late Republic to Late Antiquity

$180.00 (R)

Annalisa Marzano, Guy P. R. Métraux, Ursula Rothe, Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, John R. Clarke, Mantha Zarmakoupi, Thomas Noble Howe, Adele Campanelli, Giovanni Di Maio, Riccardo Iaccarino, Maria Antonietta Iannelli, Luciana Jacobelli, Masanori Aoyagi, Antonio De Simone, Girolamo F. De Simone, Maurizio Gualtieri, Gian Pietro Brogiolo, Alexandra Chavarría Arnau, Roger J. A. Wilson, Loïc Buffat, Felix Teichner, Anthony Bonanno, Oren Tal, Israel Roll, Zeev Weiss, Maria Papaioannou, William Bowden, Gisela Ripoll, Kimberly Bowes, Pierre de la Ruffinière du Prey, Kenneth Lapatin
View all contributors
  • Date Published: July 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107164314

$ 180.00 (R)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This volume offers a comprehensive survey of Roman villas in Italy and the Mediterranean provinces of the Roman Empire, from their origins to the collapse of the Empire. The architecture of villas could be humble or grand, and sometimes luxurious. Villas were most often farms where wine, olive oil, cereals, and manufactured goods, among other products, were produced. They were also venues for hospitality, conversation, and thinking on pagan, and ultimately Christian, themes. Villas spread as the Empire grew. Like towns and cities, they became the means of power and assimilation, just as infrastructure, such as aqueducts and bridges, was transforming the Mediterranean into a Roman sea. The distinctive Roman/Italian villa type was transferred to the provinces, resulting in Mediterranean-wide culture of rural dwelling and work that further unified the Empire.

    • Shows a wide view of Roman villas throughout the Roman Mediterranean from their inception in the third/second century BCE to their end in the sixth century CE, coordinating sites from region to region so that locally known sites are seen in large historical perspective
    • Offers an outline of methodological issues (origins of villas, slavery in agriculture, social/economic import) in a clear, non-scholarly way, making it an excellent overview of the intellectual aspects of archaeological study of villas for a general educated audience as well as a scholarly one
    • Gives an up-to-date account of famous villas, little-known sites in often-neglected regions (such as the former Yugoslavia, Libya and Southern Italy), and new discoveries (in Greece at Marathon and Eua Loukou), some dating to 2016, offering a reliable, contemporary account of the phenomena associated with Roman villas
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107164314
    • dimensions: 289 x 224 x 38 mm
    • weight: 2.33kg
    • contains: 244 b/w illus. 21 maps
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Introduction
    1. The Roman villa in the Mediterranean: an overview Annalisa Marzano and Guy P.R. Métraux
    2. The Roman villa. Definitions and variations Ursula Rothe
    Part I. Roman Villas in or Near the Bay of Naples and Maritime Villas: Current Research:
    3. The 'Villa of the Mysteries' at Pompeii and the ideals of Hellenistic hospitality Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
    4. The building history and aesthetics of the 'Villa of Poppaea' at Torre Annunziata: results from the Oplontis Project 2005–14 John R. Clarke
    5. Landscape at the 'Villa of Poppaea' (Villa A) at Torre Annunziata Mantha Zarmakoupi
    6. The villas of Stabiae Thomas Noble Howe
    7. The Roman villa of Positano Adele Campanelli, Giovanni Di Maio, Riccardo Iaccarino, Maria Antonietta Iannelli, Luciana Jacobelli
    8. Maritime villas and the resources of the sea Annalisa Marzano
    9 The 'Villa of Augustus' at Somma Vesuviana Masanori Aoyagi, Antonio De Simone and Girolamo F. De Simone
    Part II. Roman Villas in the Mediterranean: Current Research:
    10. Villas in Southern Italy Maurizio Gualtieri
    11. Villas in Northern Italy Gian Pietro Brogiolo and Alexandra Chavarría Arnau
    12. Roman villas in Sicily Roger J. A. Wilson
    13. Villas in south and southwestern Gaul Loïc Buffat
    14. Villas in Hispania and Lusitania Felix Teichner
    15. Roman villas in the Maltese archipelago Anthony Bonanno
    16. Villas in North Africa Roger J. A. Wilson
    17. The Roman villa at Apollonia Oren Tal and Israel Roll
    18. Houses of the wealthy in Roman Galilee Zeev Weiss
    19. Villas in Greece and the Islands Maria Papaioannou
    20. Villas of the eastern Adriatic and Ionian coastlands William Bowden
    Part III. Roman Villas: Late Antique Manifestations:
    21. Late antique villas: themes Guy P. R. Métraux
    22. Aristocratic residences in late antique Hispania Gisela Ripoll
    23. Christianization of villas Kimberly Bowes
    Part IV. Roman Villas: Later Manifestations:
    24. Conviviality versus seclusion in Pliny's Tuscan and Laurentine villas Pierre de la Ruffinière du Prey
    25. The 'Villa dei Papiri': Herculaneum and Malibu Kenneth Lapatin
    Conclusion Annalisa Marzano and Guy P. R. Métraux.

  • Editors

    Annalisa Marzano, University of Reading
    Annalisa Marzano (Ph.D. 2004, Columbia University, New York) is Professor of Ancient History at the University of Reading, and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Society of Antiquaries of London. She has published on a wide range of topics related to the social and economic history of the Roman world and has participated in numerous archaeological projects. She is the author of two monographs, Roman Villas in Central Italy. A Social and Economic History (2007), which won the Silver Medal and Honorable Mention at the VIII Premio Romanistico Internazionale Gerard Boulvert, and Harvesting the Sea: The Exploitation of Marine Resources in the Roman Mediterranean (2013).

    Guy P. R. Métraux, York University, Toronto
    Guy P. R. Métraux (Ph.D. 1972, Harvard University, Massachusetts) is Professor Emeritus of Visual Arts at York University, Toronto, and a member of the Collaborative Program in Ancient History (University of Toronto/York University). He has participated in archaological excavations in Italy, Turkey, and Tunisia, co-authoring The San Rocco Villa at Francolise (London and New York 1985) with M. Aylwin Cotton. His 1995 book Sculptors and Physicians in Fifth century Greece won the Raymond Klibansky Prize from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council. A Guggenheim Fellow, his current work focuses on villas in their literary and physical aspects.

    Contributors

    Annalisa Marzano, Guy P. R. Métraux, Ursula Rothe, Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, John R. Clarke, Mantha Zarmakoupi, Thomas Noble Howe, Adele Campanelli, Giovanni Di Maio, Riccardo Iaccarino, Maria Antonietta Iannelli, Luciana Jacobelli, Masanori Aoyagi, Antonio De Simone, Girolamo F. De Simone, Maurizio Gualtieri, Gian Pietro Brogiolo, Alexandra Chavarría Arnau, Roger J. A. Wilson, Loïc Buffat, Felix Teichner, Anthony Bonanno, Oren Tal, Israel Roll, Zeev Weiss, Maria Papaioannou, William Bowden, Gisela Ripoll, Kimberly Bowes, Pierre de la Ruffinière du Prey, Kenneth Lapatin

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×