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The Fall of Cities in the Mediterranean
Commemoration in Literature, Folk-Song, and Liturgy

$110.00 (C)

Margaret Alexiou, Ann Suter, John Jacobs, Mary R. Bachvarova, Dorota Dutsch, Geoffrey Bakewell, Seth A. Jeppesen, Alison Keith, Jo-Ann Shelton, Catherine Conybeare, Andromache Karanika, Gail Holst-Warhaft
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  • Date Published: February 2016
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107031968

$ 110.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • A body of theory has developed about the role and function of memory in creating and maintaining cultural identity. Yet there has been no consideration of the rich Mediterranean and Near Eastern traditions of laments for fallen cities in commemorating or resolving communal trauma. This volume offers new insights into the trope of the fallen city in folk-song and a variety of literary genres. These commemorations reveal memories modified by diverse agendas, and contains narrative structures and motifs that show the meaning of memory-making about fallen cities. Opening a new avenue of research into the Mediterranean genre of city lament, this book examines references to, or re-workings of, otherwise lost texts or ways of commemorating fallen cities in the extant texts, and with greater emphasis than usual on the point of view of the victors.

    • Discusses a broad range of literary and folk genres from the second millennium BCE to the beginning of the twentieth century CE, opening up new areas of research
    • Extends the study of collective memory through a focus on the hitherto neglected genre and motif of city lament
    • All texts discussed are translated and specialized terms are explained
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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2016
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107031968
    • length: 291 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 159 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.56kg
    • contains: 1 map
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword Margaret Alexiou
    1. Introduction Ann Suter
    2. The city lament genre in the Ancient Near East John Jacobs
    3. The destroyed city in ancient 'world history': from Agade to Troy Mary R. Bachvarova
    4. Mourning a city 'empty of men': stereotypes of Anatolian communal lament in Aeschylus' Persians Mary R. Bachvarova and Dorota Dutsch
    5. Seven Against Thebes, city laments, and Athenian history Geoffrey Bakewell
    6. Lament for fallen cities in Early Roman drama: Naevius, Ennius, and Plautus Seth A. Jeppesen
    7. City lament in Augustan epic: antitypes of Rome from Troy to Alba Longa Alison Keith
    8. The fall of Troy in Seneca's Troades Jo-Ann Shelton
    9. How to lament an eternal city: the ambiguous fall of Rome Catherine Conybeare
    10. Messengers, angels, and laments for the fall of Constantinople Andromache Karanika
    11. 'A sudden longing': remembering the lost city of Smyrna Gail Holst-Warhaft.

  • Editors

    Mary R. Bachvarova, Willamette University, Oregon
    Mary R. Bachvarova is a Professor in the Department of Classical Studies at Willamette University, Oregon. Her publications include From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Ancient Greek Epic (Cambridge, 2015).

    Dorota Dutsch, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Dorota Dutsch is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her publications include Feminine Discourse in Roman Comedy: On Echoes and Voices (2008) and Women in Roman Republic Drama (co-edited with David Konstan and Sharon James, 2015).

    Ann Suter, University of Rhode Island
    Ann Suter is retired Professor Emerita of Classical Studies at the University of Rhode Island. Her publications include The Narcissus and the Pomegranate: An Archaeology of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter (2002) and Lament: Studies in the Ancient Mediterranean and Beyond (editor, 2008).

    Contributors

    Margaret Alexiou, Ann Suter, John Jacobs, Mary R. Bachvarova, Dorota Dutsch, Geoffrey Bakewell, Seth A. Jeppesen, Alison Keith, Jo-Ann Shelton, Catherine Conybeare, Andromache Karanika, Gail Holst-Warhaft

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