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Information Flow
The Logic of Distributed Systems

$59.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge Tracts in Theoretical Computer Science

  • Date Published: August 2008
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521070997

$ 59.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Information is a central topic in computer science, cognitive science, and philosophy. In spite of its importance in the "information age," there is no consensus on what information is, what makes it possible, and what it means for one medium to carry information about another. Drawing on ideas from mathematics, computer science, and philosophy, this book addresses the definition and place of information in society. The authors, observing that information flow is possible only within a connected distribution system, provide a mathematically rigorous, philosophically sound foundation for a science of information. They illustrate their theory by applying it to a wide range of phenomena, from file transfer to DNA, from quantum mechanics to speech act theory.

    • Barwise is a well-known author in this area. His books include The Liar and the Tarski's World, Turing's World, and Hyperproof series
    • Contains many illustrative examples and exercises (most with solutions) to make the material more interesting and accessible
    • Topic of the book is of central importance to the fields of computer science, logic, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy and philosophy of science
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This important interdisciplinary text is ideal for graduate students and researchers in mathematics, computer science, philosophy, linguistics, logic, and cognitive science." Computing Reviews

    "This iis an enjoyable book on information flow, an important recent topic in the study of logic, language and computation, enriching the science of information by a mathematically rigorous foundation." Mathematical Reviews

    "...two thumbs up...." Complexity

    "...an important book...useful...inspiring...accessible to most graduate students in logic, computer science, philosophy, mathematics, linguistics, and cognitive science. Everyone working in those areas will find material of interest in the book." Journal of Symbolic Logic

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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2008
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521070997
    • length: 292 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 17 mm
    • weight: 0.43kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Part I. Introduction:
    1. Information flow: a review
    2. Information channels: an overview
    3. A simple distributed system
    Part II. Channel Theory:
    4. Classifications and infomorphisms
    5. Operations on classifications
    6. Distributed systems
    7. Boolean operations and classifications
    8. State spaces
    9. Regular theories
    10. Operations on theories
    11. Boolean operations and theories
    12. Local logics
    13. Reasoning at a distance
    14. Representing local logics
    15. Distributed logics
    16. Logics and state spaces
    Part III. Explorations:
    17. Speech acts
    18. Vagueness
    19. Common sense reasoning
    20. Representation
    21. Quantum logic
    Answers to selected exercises
    Bibliography
    Glossary of notation
    Index of definitions
    Index of names.

  • Authors

    Jon Barwise, Indiana University

    Jerry Seligman, University of Auckland

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