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Strategy and Performance

Strategy and Performance
Getting the Measure of Your Business

$124.00 (P)

Part of Strategy and Performance

  • Date Published: July 2002
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521750318

$ 124.00 (P)
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About the Authors
  • Understanding how your manufacturing business performs is essential to remain competitive, but extremely difficult to do. The main purpose of this book is to provide directors, managers, change agents and consultants with simple but effective tools to help design and implement performance measurement systems, such as the Balanced Scorecard. It contains specific tools which will be of interest to practicing managers and consultants. These tools and techniques have been developed over many years and honed through application in companies such as Rolls-Royce Aerospace and Federal Mogul. Besides large multi-nationals, the techniques have also been used effectively in medium and smaller sized entreprises and are appropriate to any manufacturing company employing 50 people or more.

    • Step-by-step guide to developing and implementing strategy for manufacturing organisations
    • Developed by the Cambridge Institute for Manufacturing with major industrial clients
    • Part of three volume set covering business strategy, performance and competencies
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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2002
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521750318
    • length: 156 pages
    • dimensions: 246 x 175 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.356kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Process Overview:
    1. What is performance and why measure it?
    2. What does a performance measurement system include?
    3. The process of performance measurement system design
    4. Summary of phase 1 of the procedure
    5. Summary of phase 2 of the procedure
    6. Participation
    7. Internal participation
    8. External participation
    9. Process and project management
    10. Launching the process
    11. Further reading
    Part II. Selecting a Facilitator:
    12. Launching the process
    13. The workbook
    14. What are our main customer-product groups?
    15. What are our business objectives?
    16. Are we achieving our business objectives?
    17. Have we chosen the right measures?
    18. Using our measures to manage the business
    19. What can we use to drive performance towards our objectives?
    20. Which performance drivers are the most important?
    21. How do we know these drivers are working?
    22. Have we chosen the right measures for the drivers?
    23. Using these measures to drive business performance.

  • Resources for

    Strategy and Performance

    Andy Neely, Michael Bourne, John Mills, Ken Platts, Huw Richards

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  • Authors

    Andy Neely, University of Cambridge
    Dr Mike Bourne joined the faculty at Cranfield School of Management in October 2000 and works on a number of projects involving assisting a number of blue chip companies with the development of their use of data and performance measures. Mike's career includes a research post at the Institute for Manufacturing, Cambridge and a wide variety of positions in industry, including periods in production management, business systems, strategy and acquisitions.

    Michael Bourne, Cranfield University, UK
    John Mills spent 20 years with Shell International and Philips Electronics, initially in consultancy roles and then in factory, development and business management, especially in electronics and mobile communications industries. He joined Cambridge University in 1992 and is based at the Institute for Manufacturing in Cambridge.

    John Mills, University of Cambridge
    Andy Neely is Director of the Centre for Business Performance at Cranfield School of Management and Professor of Operations Strategy and Performance. He has consulted to and worked with numerous organisations including 3M, Andersen Consulting, Aventis, British Aerospace, British Airways, British Telecom, DHL, Diageo, KPMG, NatWest Bank, Pilkington, Reckitt and Colman, and Rolls Royce Aerospace.

    Ken Platts, Cranfield University, UK
    Dr Ken Platts spent the first part of his career working in manufacturing engineering and manufacturing management with companies making shoe machinery, ac generators, bicycles and cranes. Following an 18 month Fellowship in Manufacturing Management at Cranfield University, he went on to head the Computer Aided Manufacturing Group at TI Research labs before joining the University of Cambridge where he has just completed a three year term as the Director of the Manufacturing Engineering Tripos BA and MEng programmes.

    Huw Richards, University of Cambridge
    Huw Richards worked in a variety of roles before studying mechanical and production engineering. After more than 10 years as a freelance consultant in training and communications, he joined a research project at the University of Cambridge in 1992 to develop processes to help manufacturing companies formulate strategy and design appropriate performance measurement systems. He is currently based at the Institute for Manufacturing in Cambridge.

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