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Look Inside Lost Words and Lost Worlds

Lost Words and Lost Worlds
Modernity and the Language of Everyday Life in Late Nineteenth-Century Stockholm

$53.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge Human Geography

  • Author: Allan Pred, University of California, Berkeley
  • Date Published: November 2005
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521022255

$ 53.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • In this original study of the transformation of late nineteenth-century Stockholm into a flourishing industrial capital, Allan Pred reconstructs the development of Stockholm's local economy, civil society and built environment through an interpretation of lost elements of language, of forgotten fragments of daily discourse, of lost words and meanings that belonged to members of the working and periodically employed classes. Pred demonstrates how the emergence of industrial capitalism in Stockholm and the onslaught of modernization were not simply imposed upon the local arena; instead they were given their own distinctive local identity and meaning.

    Reviews & endorsements

    "...uniquely innovative in its materials and methodology." Choice

    "The strength of Pred's method is its immersion in detail. His scholarship is impressive; his familiarity with Swedish sources should set a standard for other American social scientists working in Sweden. In the best parts of the book, the author marshalls his evidence to support colorful accounts of daily life for the working classes." Peter Stromberg, Ethnohistory

    "...the distinctively empirical, playfully theoretical, and decidedly original work of Allan Pred deserves careful attention. In Lost Words and Lost Worlds: Everyday Life in Late Nineteenth-century Stockholm, Pred develops an apparently esoteric topic into a finely tuned theoretical argument, using lost linguistic expressions of old Stockholm as a discursive foil against which to set a very special reading of the worlds lost to modernity." Dierdre Boden, Contemporary Sociology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2005
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521022255
    • length: 328 pages
    • dimensions: 234 x 156 x 17 mm
    • weight: 0.471kg
    • contains: 22 b/w illus. 16 maps 3 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of plates
    List of figures
    Forewording and forewarning fragments
    List of abbreviations
    1. Pretext(s): lost words as reflections of lost worlds
    2. A diversity of tongues: the practiced languages of Stockholm, 1880–1900
    3. Mundane mouthings about things, tasks, and tactics: lost wor(l)ds of production, distribution, and consumption
    4. Footing about the city, or getting around the streets and ideological domination: lost wor(l)ds of spatial orientation and popular geography
    5. Finger-pointing at the Other and speaking I to eye: lost wor(l)ds of social reference and address
    6. The world of the docks and the docker in the world
    Last words on lost worlds
    Notes
    Index.

  • Author

    Allan Pred, University of California, Berkeley

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