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Radio Soundings
South Africa and the Black Modern

$105.00 (C)

Part of The International African Library

  • Date Published: March 2019
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108470643

$ 105.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Zulu Radio in South Africa is one of the most far-reaching and influential media in the region, currently attracting around 6.67 million listeners daily. While the public and political role of radio is well-established, what is less understood is how it has shaped culture by allowing listeners to negotiate modern identities and fast-changing lifestyles. Liz Gunner explores how understandings of the self, family, and social roles were shaped through this medium of voice and mediated sound. Radio was the unseen literature of the auditory, the drama of the airwaves, and thus became a conduit for many talents squeezed aside by apartheid repression. Besides Winnie Mahlangu and K. E. Masinga, among other talents, the exiles Lewis Nkosi and Bloke Modisane made a network of identities and conversations which stretched from the heart of Harlem to the American South, drawing together the threads of activism and creativity from both Black America and the African continent at a critical moment of late empire.

    • Maps out a new field of literary and media history in Africa
    • Demonstrates radio's role in linking progressive forces across the Black Atlantic, Britain and post-colonial Africa
    • Sheds light on how radio became part of a modernizing popular culture cutting through apartheid repression
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108470643
    • length: 242 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.53kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: radio, the SABC and the politics of culture
    Part I. Sound and 'Migration':
    1. K. E. Masinga, Zulu Radio and the politics of 'migrant' aurality
    2. Remembering the past, making the present: the radio worlds of Alexius Buthelezi 1961–1978
    Part II. Distance and Intimacy:
    3. Exile: Bloke Modisane and the BBC 1959–1987
    4. 'Africa on the rise': the early 1960s, and the radio Voice of Lewis Nkosi
    Part III. Drama, Language, and Daily Life:
    5. Untidy boundaries, restless identities: Zulu serial drama in the 1970s
    6. Radio drama in the time of violence: Yiz' Uvalo (In Spite of Fear) December 1986 – May 1987
    7. 'Ikusasa Lethu' (Our Tomorrow): the 'glorious decade'? Radio drama of the 1990s
    8. Finding a centre
    Conclusion: dances of power
    References
    Index.

  • Author

    Liz Gunner, University of Johannesburg
    Liz Gunner is visiting research professor in the School of Languages, University of Johannesburg. She has taught in South Africa, Sierra Leone and England. Her research primarily focusses on radio, popular culture, orality, and on the intersection of performance and the political in Southern Africa. She has published extensively in journals such as African Affairs, Research in African Literatures and Journal of Southern African Studies. Her most recent books include the co-edited Radio in Africa: Publics, Cultures, Communities (2012) and Power, Marginality and African Oral Literature (with Graham Furniss) (Cambridge, 1995).

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