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Marriage, Law and Gender in Revolutionary China, 1940–1960

$105.00 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in the History of the People's Republic of China

  • Date Published: August 2016
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107148567

$ 105.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Xiaoping Cong examines the social and cultural significance of Chinese revolutionary legal practice in the construction of marriage and gender relations. Her book is an empirically rich investigation of the ways in which a 1943 legal dispute over an arranged marriage in a Chinese village became a legal, political and cultural exemplar on the national stage. This conceptually groundbreaking study revisits the Chinese Revolution and its impact on women and society by presenting a Chinese experience that cannot and should not be theorized in the framework of Western discourse. Taking a cultural-historical perspective, Cong shows how the Chinese Revolution and its legal practices produced new discourses, neologisms and cultural symbols that contained China's experience in twentieth-century social movements, and how revolutionary practice was sublimated into the concept of 'self-determination', an idea that bridged local experiences with the tendency of the twentieth-century world, and that is a revolutionary legacy for China today.

    • Explores the social and cultural significance of Chinese revolutionary legal practice in the construction of marriage and gender relations
    • Adopts a cultural and historical approach to show how the Chinese Revolution and its legal practices produced new discourses, neologisms and cultural symbols
    • Reveals how a 1943 legal dispute over an arranged marriage in a Chinese village became a legal, political and cultural exemplar on the national stage
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Empirically rich and conceptually innovative, Cong’s book presents a detailed investigation of the development of the Communist judicial system in the BR as well as a close examination of the social and cultural implications of Chinese revolutionary legal practice for women and gender relations … Deftly moving between legal history and cultural history, and deploying interdisciplinary approaches to tacking historical puzzles, Xiaoping Cong has made a significant contribution to the history of the Chinese Communist Revolution.' The American Historical Review

    'Xiaoping Cong’s study explores Chinese Communist Party (CCP) marriage legislation and its implications for the relationship between women and the state between 1940 and 1960. … In focusing on the impact of the Communist revolution on women and the issue of agency, Cong returns to a question that has, in various guises prompted intermittent debate among historians: Was the revolution good or bad for women?' Pamela Hunt, Twentieth-Century China

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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2016
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107148567
    • length: 344 pages
    • dimensions: 237 x 157 x 19 mm
    • weight: 0.73kg
    • contains: 15 b/w illus. 2 maps 2 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Locality, Marriage Practice and Women:
    1. The case of Feng v. Zhang: marriage reform in a revolutionary region
    2. The appeal: women, love, marriage, and the revolutionary state
    Part II. Legal Practice and New Principle:
    3. The new adjudication: the judicial construction in marriage reform
    4. A new principle in the making: from 'freedom' to 'self-determination' of marriage through legal practice
    Part III. Politics and Gender in Construction:
    5. Newspaper reports: casting a new democracy in village communities
    6. The Qin opera and the ballad: from rebellious daughters to social mothers
    7. The Ping opera and movie: nationalizing the new marriage practice and politicizing the state-family, 1949–1960
    Epilogue: 'Liu Qiao'er', law, and zi-zhu: beyond 1960
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Xiaoping Cong, University of Houston
    Xiaoping Cong is a scholar of late imperial and twentieth-century China. Her previous book, Teachers' Schools and the Making of the Modern Chinese Nation-State, 1897–1937 (2007), was awarded a prize from the Chinese Historians in the United States society (CHUS) in 2008. Professor Cong has published a number of refereed journal articles and book chapters in both English and Chinese in the United States, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia and the Netherlands. She has also received several prestigious research grants, from Fulbright (2008–9), ACLS (2008–9) and AHA (2006). She was the President of the CHUS from 2011 to 2013, and is currently the secretary-treasurer (2014–16) of the Historical Society of Twentieth-Century China (HSTCC).

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