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Fiscal Capacity and the Colonial State in Asia and Africa, c. 1850–1960

Fiscal Capacity and the Colonial State in Asia and Africa, c. 1850–1960

$99.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Economic History - Second Series

  • Editors:
  • Ewout Frankema, Wageningen Universiteit, The Netherlands
  • Anne Booth, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Ewout Frankema, Anne Booth, Tirthankar Roy, Montserrat López Jerez, Kent Deng, Marlous van Waijenburg, Leigh Gardner, Kleoniki Alexopoulou, Abel Gwaindepi, Krige Siebrits
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  • Publication planned for: January 2020
  • availability: Not yet published - available from January 2020
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108494267

$ 99.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • This book examines the evolution of fiscal capacity in the context of colonial state formation and the changing world order between 1850 and 1960. Until the early nineteenth century, European colonial control over Asia and Africa was largely confined to coastal and island settlements, which functioned as little more than trading posts. The officials running these settlements had neither the resources nor the need to develop new fiscal instruments. With the expansion of imperialism, the costs of maintaining colonies rose. Home governments, reluctant to place the financial burden of imperial expansion on metropolitan taxpayers, pressed colonial governments to become fiscally self-supporting. A team of leading historians provides a comparative overview of how colonial states set up their administrative systems and how these regimes involved local people and elites. They shed new light on the political economy of colonial state formation and the institutional legacies they left behind at independence.

    • Addresses the emergence and development of colonial fiscal states in Asia and Africa against the backdrop of the changing imperial world order
    • Explores how colonial legacies of fiscal development have long-term implications for both political and socio-economic development
    • Provides one of the first comparative studies on colonial fiscal development
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: January 2020
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108494267
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 mm
    • availability: Not yet published - available from January 2020
  • Table of Contents

    1. Fiscal capacity and the Colonial State. Lessons from a comparative perspective Ewout Frankema and Anne Booth
    2. Towards a modern fiscal state in Southeast Asia, c. 1900–60 Anne Booth
    3. Why was British India a limited state? Tirthankar Roy
    4. Indigenous and colonial institutions in the fiscal development of French Indochina Montserrat López Jerez
    5. Fiscal development in Taiwan, Korea and Manchuria: was Japanese colonialism different? Anne Booth and Kent Deng
    6. From coast to hinterland. Fiscal capacity building in British and French West Africa, c. 1880–1960 Ewout Frankema and Marlous van Waijenburg
    7. New colonies, old tools. Building fiscal systems in East and Central Africa Leigh Gardner
    8. Local conditions and metropolitan visions: fiscal policies and practices in Portuguese Africa, c.1850–1970 Kleoniki Alexopoulou
    9. How mineral discoveries shaped the fiscal system of South Africa Abel Gwaindepi and Krige Siebrits.

  • Editors

    Ewout Frankema, Wageningen Universiteit, The Netherlands
    Ewout Frankema is Professor and Chair of Rural and Environmental History at Wageningen University. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Global History and research fellow of the UK Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).

    Anne Booth, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
    Anne Booth is Professor Emerita at SOAS, University of London. She has researched on the economies of Southeast Asia in both the colonial and post-colonial eras, and has written and edited a number of books on the region as well as articles in journals.

    Contributors

    Ewout Frankema, Anne Booth, Tirthankar Roy, Montserrat López Jerez, Kent Deng, Marlous van Waijenburg, Leigh Gardner, Kleoniki Alexopoulou, Abel Gwaindepi, Krige Siebrits

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