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Conquest and Christianization
Saxony and the Carolingian World, 772–888

$105.00 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series

  • Date Published: February 2018
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107196216

$ 105.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Following its violent conquest by Charlemagne (772–804), Saxony became both a Christian and a Carolingian region. This book sets out to re-evaluate the political integration and Christianization of Saxony and to show how the success of this transformation has important implications for how we view governance, the institutional church, and Christian communities in the early Middle Ages. A burgeoning array of Carolingian regional studies are pulled together to offer a new synthesis of the history of Saxony in the Carolingian Empire and to undercut the narrative of top-down Christianization with a more grassroots model that highlights the potential for diversity within Carolingian Christianity. This book is a comprehensive and accessible account which will provide students with a fresh view of the incorporation of Saxony into the Carolingian world.

    • Offers a new synthesis of the history of Saxony in the Carolingian period
    • Suggests a more grassroots model of Christianization
    • Accessible to students and non-specialist readers
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Offers a laudably clear and nuanced study that will offer stronger foundations for the subject going forward, and hopefully connect developments in Saxony more fully with those being studied elsewhere in the Carolingian world. … anyone wishing to study the regional diversity of the Carolingian world in future, or indeed processes of conquest and conversion, will appreciate the clarity and detail of Rembold's work.' James T. Palmer, The Medieval Review

    'Elegantly bringing together political and ecclesiastical strands … [Rembold] presents us with ‘a case study of social transformation’ … [Her] study is sure to play an important role in future discussions about Saxons in the Carolingian world.' Lutz E. von Padberg, German Historical Institute London Bulletin

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107196216
    • length: 292 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 159 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.6kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus. 5 maps
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Politics of Conquest:
    1. The Saxon Wars
    2. The Stellinga
    Part II. Conversion and Christianization:
    3. Founders and patrons
    4. Religion and society
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Ingrid Rembold, University of Oxford
    Ingrid Rembold is a Junior Research Fellow at Hertford College, Oxford. Her research to date has examined themes relating to governance, monasticism, and Christianization in the early medieval world. Her publications include articles in Early Medieval Europe, the Journal of Medieval History, and History Compass. She was awarded the Early Medieval Europe Essay Prize and the Prince Consort and Thirlwall Prize and Seeley Medal.

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