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Murder in Renaissance Italy

$84.00 ( ) USD

Trevor Dean, K. J. P. Lowe, Scott Nethersole, Henri Bresc, Thomas V. Cohen, Sarah Rubin Blanshei, Stefano Dall'Aglio, Silvio Leydi, Rosa Salzberg, Massimo Rospocher, Anna Esposito, Alessandro Pastore, Stephen Bowd, Enrica Guerra, C. D. Dickerson, III
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  • Date Published: June 2017
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108239509

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About the Authors
  • This invaluable collection explores the many faces of murder, and its cultural presences, across the Italian peninsula between 1350 and 1650. These shape the content in different ways: the faces of homicide range from the ordinary to the sensational, from the professional to the accidental, from the domestic to the public; while the cultural presence of homicide is revealed through new studies of sculpture, paintings, and popular literature. Dealing with a range of murders, and informed by the latest criminological research on homicide, it brings together new research by an international team of specialists on a broad range of themes: different kinds of killers (by gender, occupation, and situation); different kinds of victim (by ethnicity, gender, and status); and different kinds of evidence (legal, judicial, literary, and pictorial). It will be an indispensable resource for students of Renaissance Italy, late medieval/early modern crime and violence, and homicide studies.

    • Allows readers to see how murder permeated Renaissance society and culture
    • Links the study of historical murder with contemporary attitudes to types of murder
    • Brings together leading experts in the field to offer a comprehensive portrait of the law, literature, and imagery of murder
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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108239509
    • contains: 23 b/w illus.
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Introducing Renaissance killers Trevor Dean and K. J. P. Lowe
    Part I. Domestic Murder:
    1. The first murder: the representation of Cain and Abel in Bologna, Florence and Bergamo Scott Nethersole
    2. Knives and poisons: stereotypes of male vendetta and female perfidy in late Medieval Sicily, 1293–1460 Henri Bresc
    3. A daughter-killing digested, and accepted (Sabine district of Rome, 1563 to 1566) Thomas V. Cohen
    Part II: Ordinary Murder:
    4. Eight varieties of homicide: Bologna in the 1340s and 1440s Trevor Dean
    5. Homicide in a culture of hatred: Bologna, 1352–1420 Sarah Rubin Blanshei
    Part III. Sensational Murder:
    6. Truths and lies of a renaissance murder: Duke Alessandro de' Medici's death between history, narrative and memory Stefano Dall'Aglio
    7. 'O Facinus Inauditum' (O horrendous crime): anthropophagy in Renaissance Milan Silvio Leydi
    8. Murder ballads: singing, hearing, writing and reading about murder in Renaissance Italy Rosa Salzberg and Massimo Rospocher
    Part IV. Unclassifiable Murder:
    9. Redrawing the line between murder and suicide in Renaissance Italy K. J. P. Lowe
    10. Violent conflicts and murder involving Jews in Renaissance Italy Anna Esposito
    11. Poison and poisoning in Renaissance Italy Alessandro Pastore
    Part V. Professional Murder:
    12. Mass murder in sacks during the Italian wars, 1494–1559 Stephen Bowd
    13. Legal homicide: the death penalty in the Italian Renaissance Enrica Guerra
    14. Butchers as murderers in Renaissance Italy C. D. Dickerson, III.

  • Editors

    Trevor Dean, Roehampton Institute, London
    Trevor Dean is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Roehampton, and one of the leading historians of crime in medieval Europe. His previous related publications include Crime and Justice in Late Medieval Italy (Cambridge, 2007) and a volume of essays, also co-edited with K. J. P. Lowe, entitled Crime, Law and Society in Renaissance Italy (Cambridge, 1994).

    K. J. P. Lowe, Queen Mary University of London
    K. J. P. Lowe is Professor of Renaissance History and Culture at Queen Mary University of London. Her previous publications include Church and Politics in Renaissance Italy (Cambridge, 2002) and Nuns' Chronicles and Convent Culture in Renaissance and Counter-Reformation Italy (Cambridge, 2003), and she edited (with T. F. Earle) Black Africans in Renaissance Europe (Cambridge, 2005). Her latest book, edited with Annemarie Jordan Gschwend, is The Global City: On the Streets of Renaissance Lisbon (2015).

    Contributors

    Trevor Dean, K. J. P. Lowe, Scott Nethersole, Henri Bresc, Thomas V. Cohen, Sarah Rubin Blanshei, Stefano Dall'Aglio, Silvio Leydi, Rosa Salzberg, Massimo Rospocher, Anna Esposito, Alessandro Pastore, Stephen Bowd, Enrica Guerra, C. D. Dickerson, III

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