Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Postal Systems in the Pre-Modern Islamic World

$34.00 ( ) USD

Part of Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization

  • Date Published: September 2007
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511287053

$ 34.00 USD ( )
Adobe eBook Reader

You will be taken to ebooks.com for this purchase
Buy eBook Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, Paperback


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Adam Silverstein's book offers a fascinating account of the official methods of communication employed in the Near East from pre-Islamic times through the Mamluk period. Postal systems were set up by rulers in order to maintain control over vast tracts of land. These systems, invented centuries before steam-engines or cars, enabled the swift circulation of different commodities - from letters, people and horses to exotic fruits and ice. As the correspondence transported often included confidential reports from a ruler's provinces, such postal systems doubled as espionage-networks through which news reached the central authorities quickly enough to allow a timely reaction to events. The book sheds light not only on the role of communications technology in Islamic history, but also on how nomadic culture contributed to empire-building in the Near East. This is a long-awaited contribution to the history of pre-modern communications systems in the Near Eastern world.

    • A fascinating book analysing the official methods of communication employed in Near Eastern history, from pre-Islamic times through the Mamluk period
    • Will appeal to scholars in Islamic history, and to those interested in the history of pre-modern technology in general and communications-technology in particular
    • Includes detailed maps of postal routes
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "Adam Silverstein's work on postal systems (i.e., the barid) and communications in the medieval Islamic world goes a long way toward correcting one of the deficiencies in the field.... Silverstein is to be commended for this ambitious project; it is a welcome and much needed addition to the field. Students and scholars of the political, economic, and administrative history of medieval Islam will benefit greatly from the foundation he has provided." - International Journal of Middle East Studies

    "The greatest value of this work to scholars and students interested in the premodern Islamic world is that Silverstein places this detailed description of postal systems into the broader picture of the political traditions of particular dynasties and rulers, notably the pre-Umayyads, Umayyads, Abbasids, Samanids, Chaznavids, Fatimids, Seljuks, Il-Khanids, and Malmuks." - The Historian

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2007
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511287053
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    List of maps
    Acknowledgements
    List of abbreviations
    Introduction
    Part I. The Pre-Islamic Background:
    1. Pre-Islamic postal systems
    Part II. Conquest and Centralisation - The Arabs:
    2. al-Barīd: the early Islamic postal system
    3. Dīwān al-Barīd: the Middle Abbasid period
    Part III. Conquest and Centralisation - The Mongols:
    4. The Mongol Yām and its legacy
    5. The Mamluk Barīd
    Conclusions
    Appendix: distances and speeds of the Barīd
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Adam J. Silverstein, University of Oxford

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×