Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Thatcher's Progress
From Social Democracy to Market Liberalism through an English New Town

$39.99 (P)

Part of Modern British Histories

  • Date Published: August 2019
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108482660

$ 39.99 (P)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • During the quarter of a century after the Second World War, the United Kingdom designated thirty-two new towns across England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Why, even before selling council houses or denationalising public industries, did Margaret Thatcher's government begin to privatise these new towns? By examining the most ambitious of these projects, Milton Keynes, Guy Ortolano recasts our understanding of British social democracy, arguing that the new towns comprised the spatial dimension of the welfare state. Following the Prime Minister's progress on a tour through Milton Keynes on 25 September 1979, Ortolano alights at successive stops to examine the broader histories of urban planning, modernist architecture, community development, international consulting, and municipal housing. Thatcher's journey reveals a dynamic social democracy during its decade of crisis, while also showing how public sector actors begrudgingly accommodated the alternative priorities of market liberalism.

    • Places Britain's new towns programme within a global context
    • Offers fresh interpretations of the welfare state, social democracy, and market liberalism - three of the most significant subjects in twentieth-century historiography
    • Ranges widely across urban, architectural, political, and intellectual history
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'Modern British political history is coming to be written through urban history. With great deftness, and a nice sense of irony, Guy Ortolano tracks the transition from social democracy to neo-liberalism through the history of Milton Keynes. The result is a significant new study of the continuities as well as the changes in ‘Thatcherism’.' Simon Gunn, University of Leicester

    'A fascinating account of the spatial politics of the British new towns program. Ortolano’s lively history of Milton Keynes illuminates the rise and fall of British social democracy and the legacy of postwar urban planning. Thatcher’s Progress is a masterly portrait of an iconic urban place. Elegantly written and a trailblazing interpretive frame makes this an instant classic in urban history.' Rosemary Wakeman, author of Practicing Utopia: An Intellectual History of the New Town Movement

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108482660
    • length: 316 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.65kg
    • contains: 17 b/w illus. 3 maps
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    List of maps
    List of illustrations
    Acknowledgments
    Introduction
    1. Horizons
    2. Planning
    3. Architecture
    4. Community
    5. Consulting
    6. Housing
    Conclusion
    Select bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Guy Ortolano, New York University
    Guy Ortolano is an Associate Professor of History at New York University. He serves as an editor of Twentieth Century British History, and is also the author of The Two Cultures Controversy: Science, Literature and Cultural Politics in Postwar Britain (Cambridge, 2009).

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×