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Student Revolt in 1968

Student Revolt in 1968
France, Italy and West Germany

$99.99 (C)

Part of New Studies in European History

  • Author: Ben Mercer, Australian National University, Canberra
  • Publication planned for: February 2020
  • availability: Not yet published - available from February 2020
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108484480

$ 99.99 (C)
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  • Student Revolt in 1968 examines the origins, course and dissolution of student protest at three universities in the 1960s - the Freie Universität Berlin in West Germany, the campus of Nanterre in France, and the Faculty of Sociology at Trento in Italy. It traces how student revolts over space, speech, sociology and cultural democratisation catalysed a dynamic protest movement within universities in the mid-1960s that expanded dramatically beyond the University in 1968. Differing visions of democratisation - mass access to education, the dissolution of high culture, the democratic control of the university - clashed and competed in a radical revaluation of the meaning of university education and democratic culture. The study also evaluates the most ambitious experiments in higher education in the 1960s - the 'Critical Universities' of West Berlin and Trento - which sought to establish democratic control of higher education before dissolving in the politics of social revolution, and offers a new and clear-sighted perspective on the 1960s

    • Provides a comparative and transnational history of social protest in the 1960s, and its impact
    • Offers a new account of the meaning of cultural and political democracy in the 1960s
    • Explains how student protest emerged simultaneously in three different states in the late 1960s
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: February 2020
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108484480
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 mm
    • availability: Not yet published - available from February 2020
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: history, myth and memory of 1968
    Part I. Education and Culture:
    1. The 'devouring monster': the university in the 1960s
    2. 'New managerial class' or 'social doctor'? The ambiguities of sociology
    3. 'Books for all': the democratisation of high culture
    4. 'Knowledge is over': the intellectual politics of 1968
    Part II. The Politics of Revolt:
    5. 'The space of autonomy must be created': the politics of democracy
    6. 'We represent nothing': the crisis of representation
    7. 'We began to talk': the seizure of speech
    Part III. Crisis of the University:
    8. 'Question, doubt and criticise': free speech at the Free University
    9. 'Student power': Vietnam at Trento
    10. 'An asylum for delinquents': the space of revolt at Nanterre
    11. 'A golden ghetto': the Critical University.

  • Author

    Ben Mercer, Australian National University, Canberra
    Ben Mercer is Lecturer in the School of History at the Australian National University, Canberra. He is the author of numerous journal articles including in French Politics, Culture & Society, the Journal of the History of Ideas and the Journal of Modern History and a contributor to The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914–1945 (2016).

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