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Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing

$43.99 (C)

Martin J. Pickering, Charles Clifton Jr, Matthew W. Crocker, Richard L. Lewis, Michael K. Tanenhaus, Michael J. Spivey-Knowlton, Joy E. Hanna, Gerry T. M. Altmann, Steffan Corley, Paola Merlo, Suzanne Stevenson, James Henderson, Colin Brown, Peter Hagoort, Matthew J. Traxler, Barbara Hemforth, Lars Konieczny, Christoph Scheepers, Marica De Vincenzi, Lyn Frazier, Linda M. Moxey, Anthony J. Sanford, Amit Almor
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  • Date Published: November 2006
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521027502

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About the Authors
  • The architectures and mechanisms underlying language processing form one important part of the general structure of cognition. This book, written by leading experts in the field, brings together linguistic, psychological, and computational perspectives on some of the fundamental issues. Several general introductory chapters offer overviews on important psycholinguistic research frameworks and highlight both shared assumptions and controversial issues. Subsequent chapters explore syntactic and lexical mechanisms, the interaction of syntax and semantics in language understanding, and the implications for cognitive architecture.

    • Recognized authorities in the field as contributors
    • Fast-moving field of interest both to academics and to applied researchers (machine language applications)
    • Book is designed to appeal across disciplines (linguistics, psychology, cognitive sciences, computer science)
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This book represents the state of the art in sentence processing, with interesting examples and opportunities for computational modeling." Computational Linguistics

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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2006
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521027502
    • length: 376 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.55kg
    • contains: 60 b/w illus. 13 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Contributors
    Preface
    1. Architectures and mechanisms in sentence comprehension Martin J. Pickering, Charles Clifton, Jr., and Matthew W. Crocker
    Part I. Frameworks:
    2. Evaluating models of human sentence processing Charles Clifton, Jr
    3. Specifying architectures for language processing: process, control, and memory in parsing and interpretation Richard L. Lewis
    4. Modeling thematic and discourse context effects with a multiple constraints approach: implications for the architecture of the language comprehension system Michael K. Tanenhaus, Michael J. Spivey-Knowlton, and Joy E. Hanna
    5. Late closure in context: some consequences for parsimony Gerry T. M. Altmann
    Part II. Syntactic and Lexical Mechanisms:
    6. The modular statistical hypothesis: exploring lexical category ambiguity Steffan Corley and Matthew W. Crocker
    7. Lexical syntax and parsing architecture Paola Merlo and Suzanne Stevenson
    8. Constituency, context, and connectionism in syntactic parsing James Henderson
    Part III. Syntax and Semantics:
    9. On the electrophysiology of language comprehension: implications for the human language system Colin Brown and Peter Hagoort
    10. Parsing and incremental understanding during reading Martin J. Pickering and Matthew J. Traxler
    11. Syntactic attachment and anaphor resolution: the two sides of relative clause attachment Barbara Hemforth, Lars Konieczny, and Christoph Scheepers
    12. Cross-linguistic psycholinguistics Marica De Vincenzi
    Part IV. Interpretation:
    13. On interpretation: minimal 'lowering' Lyn Frazier
    14. Focus effects associated with negative quantifiers Linda M. Moxey and Anthony J. Sanford
    15. Constraints and mechanisms in theories of anaphor processing Amit Almor
    Author index
    Subject index.

  • Editors

    Matthew W. Crocker, Universität des Saarlandes, Saarbrücken, Germany

    Martin Pickering, University of Glasgow

    Charles Clifton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    Contributors

    Martin J. Pickering, Charles Clifton Jr, Matthew W. Crocker, Richard L. Lewis, Michael K. Tanenhaus, Michael J. Spivey-Knowlton, Joy E. Hanna, Gerry T. M. Altmann, Steffan Corley, Paola Merlo, Suzanne Stevenson, James Henderson, Colin Brown, Peter Hagoort, Matthew J. Traxler, Barbara Hemforth, Lars Konieczny, Christoph Scheepers, Marica De Vincenzi, Lyn Frazier, Linda M. Moxey, Anthony J. Sanford, Amit Almor

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