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Look Inside The Cambridge Handbook of Policing in the United States

The Cambridge Handbook of Policing in the United States

$150.00 (R)

Cameron McLay, Thomas Harvey, Janae Staecere, Justin McCrary, Deepak Premkumar, Jonathan Simon, Eduardo Bautista Duron, Eric J. Miller, Ekow Yankah, Elizabeth Joh, Rachel Harmon, Richard A. Leo, David A. Harris, Osagie K. Obasogie, Zachary Newman, Gabriel J. Chin, Charles Manski, Daniel S. Nagin, Jeff Fagan, Amanda Geller, Franklin Zimring, Devon W. Carbado, Yolanda Vázquez,Amna Akbar, Ilan H. Meyer, Naomi G. Goldberg, Amira Hasenbush, Christy Mallory, Lara Stemple, Tamara Rice Lave, Natalie Pifer, Kami Chavis, Bennett Capers, Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, Sarah Brayne, Stephen Rushin, Rebecca Hollander Blumoff, David Kennedy, Jonathan Ben-Menachem
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  • Date Published: July 2019
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108420556

$ 150.00 (R)
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About the Authors
  • The Cambridge Handbook of Policing in the United States provides a comprehensive collection of essays on police and policing, written by leading experts in political theory, sociology, criminology, economics, law, public health, and critical theory. It unveils a range of experiences - from the police chief of a major metropolitan force to ordinary people targeted for policing on the street - and asks important questions about whether and why we need the police, before analyzing the law of policing, police use of force, and police violence, paying particular attention to the issue of discrimination against marginalized and vulnerable communities at the blunt end of police interference. The book also discusses technological innovations and proposals for reform. Written in accessible language, this interdisciplinary work will be a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding the present and future of policing in the United States.

    • Provides first-hand accounts from police officers and the people they police, discussing their experience of policing
    • Focuses on discrete, marginalized communities and the challenges they face from the police
    • Breaks down academic barriers by approaching policing from multiple perspectives: empirical, normative, and legal
    • Engages in a broad and forward-looking account of the impact of technology on policing, enabling readers to understand the ways that the police are responding to high-tech innovations, and the legal and political challenges they pose
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'This is not your average book about policing. It draws from a wide range of disciplines - not just law and criminology, but political science, sociology and economics - to provide a rich tapestry of insights into what policing is, its benefits and dangers, and how it should change. If you want to understand modern debates about policing, including whether it should continue to exist at all, this book is a must read.' Christopher Slobogin, Milton Underwood Professor Law, Vanderbilt University Law School

    'This important and compelling book brings together the nation’s leading experts on the law, political theory, sociology, and criminology of policing. The authors tackle some of the most urgent contemporary debates in policing, including uses of force, technological innovations, street level police practices, and reform proposals. This book is required reading for anyone interested in the law and practice of policing in the United States.' L. Song Richardson, Dean of University of California Irvine School of Law

    'This volume provides an excellent array of perspectives on policing in 28 essays by an impressive collection of respected authors. They deal with the good and bad aspects of operation of police on the street and provide strong understanding of the problems and approaches to improving their performance in the diverse communities of America.' Alfred Blumstein, Carnegie Mellon University

    'This sophisticated collection brings together a rich group of thinkers and viewpoints. Offering an elegant mix of policy expertise, community perspectives, social science, legal theory, and philosophy, it is at once critical and appreciative of the complex role played by policing throughout our democracy. The book is strongly interdisciplinary - it melds scholarship on social vulnerability and race with inquiries into such wide-ranging topics as police unions, technology, big data, and violence. Scholars, students, and experts alike will learn much from this provocative volume.' Alexandra Natapoff, University of California and author of Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108420556
    • length: 610 pages
    • dimensions: 260 x 184 x 38 mm
    • weight: 1.34kg
    • contains: 18 b/w illus. 10 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. The View from the Streets:
    1. Policing as though the public really matters: a call for outcome-based policing Cameron McLay
    2. Policing in St Louis: 'I feel like a runaway slave sometimes' Thomas Harvey and Janae Staecer
    Part II. Do We Need Public Police?:
    3. Why we need police Justin McCrary and Deepak Premkumar
    4. Police abolitionist discourse? Why it's been missing (and why it matters) Jonathan Simon and Eduardo Bautista Duron
    5. The police as civic neighbors Eric J. Miller
    6. Pretext and justification: republicanism, policing, and race Ekow Yankah
    7. The private policing paradox Elizabeth Joh
    Part III. The Law of Policing:
    8. Justifying police practices: the example of arrests Rachel Harmon
    9. Police interrogation and suspect confessions Richard A. Leo
    10. How fear shapes policing in the US David A. Harris
    11. The futile Fourth Amendment: understanding police excessive force doctrine through an empirical assessment of Graham v. Connor Osagie K. Obasogie and Zachary Newman
    12. The problematic prosecution of an Asian American police officer: notes from a participant in People v Peter Liang Gabriel J. Chin
    Part IV. Police Force and Police Violence:
    13. Confrontational proactive policing: benefits, costs, and disparate racial impacts Charles Manski and Daniel S. Nagin
    14. Race, police, and the production of capital homicides Jeff Fagan and Amanda Geller
    15. What drives variation in killings by urban police in the United States – two empirical puzzles Franklin Zimring
    Part V. Discrimination:
    16. Race, pedestrian checks, and the Fourth Amendment Devon W. Carbado
    17. In the shadows: policing immigration in the criminal justice system and its impact on racial disparities and identity Yolanda Vázquez
    18. Policing 'radicalization' Amna Akbar
    19. Police and the criminalization of LGBT people Ilan H. Meyer, Naomi G. Goldberg, Amira Hasenbush, Christy Mallory and Lara Stemple
    20. Police sexual violence Tamara Rice Lave
    21. Policing the mentally ill in Los Angeles on the frontlines of transinstitutionalization Natalie Pifer
    Part VI. Technology:
    22. The pitfalls of police technology: a minority report Kami Chavis
    23. Citizenship talk Bennett Capers
    24. Predictive policing theory Andrew Guthrie Ferguson
    25. Big data surveillance: the case of policing Sarah Brayne
    Part VII. Reform:
    26. Unions and police reform Stephen Rushin
    27. Procedural justice and policing: four new directions Rebecca Hollander Blumoff
    28. Moving toward an American police-community reconciliation framework David Kennedy and Jonathan Ben-Menachem.

  • Editors

    Tamara Rice Lave, University of Miami School of Law
    Tamara Rice Lave is a Professor of Law at the University of Miami. She is also a Criminal Justice Studies Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. Before getting her Ph.D., Professor Lave was a deputy public defender in San Diego for ten years where she handled a variety of cases.

    Eric J. Miller, Loyola School of Law, Los Angeles
    Eric J. Miller is a Professor and Leo J. O'Brien Fellow at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. He is currently the Chair-Elect of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Section on Criminal Justice, and the co-founder of the Policing Los Angeles Forum. Miller is a nationally recognized expert on the police and policing who has provided testimony to the United States Congress House Judiciary Committee and the United States Sentencing Commission.

    Contributors

    Cameron McLay, Thomas Harvey, Janae Staecere, Justin McCrary, Deepak Premkumar, Jonathan Simon, Eduardo Bautista Duron, Eric J. Miller, Ekow Yankah, Elizabeth Joh, Rachel Harmon, Richard A. Leo, David A. Harris, Osagie K. Obasogie, Zachary Newman, Gabriel J. Chin, Charles Manski, Daniel S. Nagin, Jeff Fagan, Amanda Geller, Franklin Zimring, Devon W. Carbado, Yolanda Vázquez,Amna Akbar, Ilan H. Meyer, Naomi G. Goldberg, Amira Hasenbush, Christy Mallory, Lara Stemple, Tamara Rice Lave, Natalie Pifer, Kami Chavis, Bennett Capers, Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, Sarah Brayne, Stephen Rushin, Rebecca Hollander Blumoff, David Kennedy, Jonathan Ben-Menachem

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