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Monitoring Laws

Monitoring Laws
Profiling and Identity in the World State

$110.00 (C)

  • Publication planned for: December 2019
  • availability: Not yet published - available from December 2019
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108426626

$ 110.00 (C)
Hardback

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  • Our world, and the objects and people within it, are increasingly interpreted and classified by automated systems. At the same time, those automated systems and their classifications influence what happens in the physical world. In this cyber-physical world or 'world state', people are asking what law's role should be in regulating these systems. In Monitoring Laws, Jake Goldenfein traces the history of government profiling, from the invention of photography to create criminal registers, through the emerging deployments of computer vision for personality, emotion, and behavioral analysis. He asks what elements and applications of profiling have provoked legal intervention in the past, and demonstrates exactly what is different about contemporary profiling that requires a new legal treatments. This work should be read by anyone interested in how computation is changing society and governance, and what the law can do to better protect us from these changes now.

    • Offers an interdisciplinary look at pressing legal questions regarding surveillance
    • Describes how the combination of statistics and sensing technologies are redefining people as patterns of behavior
    • Provides a synopsis of the past thirty years of legal thinking about automated decision-making and profiling, and analyses new and emerging regulatory proposals
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: December 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108426626
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 mm
    • availability: Not yet published - available from December 2019
  • Table of Contents

    1. Monitoring laws
    2. The image and institutional identity
    3. Images and biometrics: privacy and stigmatization
    4. Dossiers, behavioural data, and secret speculation
    5. Data subject rights and the importance of access
    6. Automation, actuarial identity, and law enforcement informatics
    7. Algorithmic accountability and the statistical legal subject
    8. From image to computer vision: identity in the world state
    9. Person, place, and contest in the world state
    10. Law and legal automation in the world state
    Index.

  • Author

    Jake Goldenfein, Cornell University, New York
    Jake Goldenfein is a Postdoctoral researcher at the Digital Life Initiative at Cornell University, New York, and a lecturer at Swinburne Law School. A law and technology scholar exploring governance in computational society, Goldenfein has published across disciplines, with work appearing in Law and Critique, the Columbia Journal of Law and Arts, the Internet Policy Review, and the University of New South Wales Law Journal.

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