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The Cambridge Handbook of Public-Private Partnerships, Intellectual Property Governance, and Sustainable Development

$170.00 (R)

Margaret Chon, Pedro Roffe, Ahmed Abdel-Latif, Frederick Abbott, Anatole Krattiger, Thomas Bombelles, Ania Jedrusik, Katy M. Graef, Jennifer Dent, Amy Starr, Esteban Burrone, Hilde Stevens, Isabelle Huys, Jens Bammel, Sara Bannerman, Susan Isiko Štrba, Melissa Levine, Joshua Sarnoff, Ayşem Mert, Philipp Pattberg, Irene Calboli, Delphine Marie-Vivienne, Padmashree Gehl Sampath, David J. Maurrasse, Chidi Oguamanam, Jeremy De Beer, Peter K. Yu
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  • Date Published: September 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107175839
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  • Public–private partnerships (PPPs) play an increasingly prominent role in addressing global development challenges. United Nations agencies and other organizations are relying on PPPs to improve global health, facilitate access to scientific information, and encourage the diffusion of climate change technologies. For this reason, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development highlights their centrality in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At the same time, the intellectual property dimensions and implications of these efforts remain under-examined. Through selective case studies, this illuminating work contributes to a better understanding of the relationships between PPPs and intellectual property considered within a global knowledge governance framework, that includes innovation, capacity-building, technological learning, and diffusion. Linking global governance of knowledge via intellectual property to the SDGs, this is the first book to chart the activities of PPPs at this important nexus.

    • Explores the diversity of existing partnerships at the interface of intellectual property and sustainable development within a global knowledge governance framework
    • Focuses on the nexus between global knowledge governance and representative public-private partnerships (PPPs) involved in sustainable development, including health, education, and climate change
    • Features detailed analyses of current and best practices of PPPs with regard to innovation, access, and other policy goals of intellectual property
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'At a time in which prospects for normative and technical assistance initiatives to address access to public goods have been overwhelmed by new challenges arising from globalization, digitization, and the failure of multilateralism, this book offers a careful study of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in a variety of sectors, using case studies that offer guidance to policymakers, raise new questions for scholars, and, collectively, outline the contours of new pathways in the design and governance of PPPs, with a distinctive path to advancing access to knowledge and access to technology. The book is a should have - and a must read.' Ruth Okediji, Harvard Law School and the Berkman Klein Center, Massachusetts

    'This timely publication explores the complex linkages between the broad policy context defined by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the concrete task of using the intellectual property (IP) system to forge practical partnerships that yield tangible results, examined through the lens of how IP rights are managed within a diverse selection of public-private partnerships. In distilling practical and policy insights from this rich vein of experience, and analysing equally diverse approaches to managing IP rights to leverage public benefit, this landmark volume opens up possibilities for a more nuanced, more grounded and more enabling understanding for policymakers of the complex roles and potential contributions of the IP system in efforts to achieve the SDGs; and it equally provides direct guidance for those engaged in the practical planning and management of knowledge-based programmes for sustainable development [and] marks a substantial advance towards the informed and empirically grounded inquiry.' Antony Taubman, World Trade Organization

    'This timely book covers a very important trio of topics, and is a ‘must-read’ for anyone interested in current issues relating to intellectual property and its broader social and developmental goals.' Edward Kwakwa, World Intellectual Property Organization

    'The twenty first century will be increasingly driven by the globalization of knowledge goods. How should intellectual property be governed in public–private partnerships if they are to comply with sustainable development goals? This impressive collection brings together concrete experiences to draw lessons for future directions in global governance of knowledge.' Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, The New School, New York

    'This book makes a long overdue contribution to the understanding of public–private partnerships (PPPs) and their role in global knowledge governance. PPPs are often found on the intersection of private intellectual property and public interest. Their variety is as plentiful as the views expressed in this book which makes it a must read for anyone interested in the question of whether PPPs address intellectual property and development challenges effectively or worsen them.' Ellen ’t Hoen, Medicines Law and Policy and Global Health Unit, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

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    Customer reviews

    16th Feb 2019 by PhillipTaylor

    A FIRST-CLASS NEW HANDBOOK AND A GREAT INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION FOR GLOBAL COMMUNITY ECO-JARGON An appreciation by Elizabeth Robson Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers and Phillip Taylor MBE, Head of Chambers and Reviews Editor, “The Barrister” It is now recognized that the politically controversial public-private partnerships (PPPs) enjoy what the editors, Margaret Chon, Pedro Roffe and Ahmed Abdel-Latif, describe as an “increasingly prominent role in addressing global development challenges”. Cambridge University Press (CUP) have brought together 27 influential contributors on these important and developing fields of law. Do begin the book by reading the excellent Foreword by Ricardo Melendez-Oriz, the head of the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). The mission is simply explained: “building bridges between different stakeholders” and “advancing mutually acceptable solutions to complex issues”- the team do that in spades! Throughout the work, it’s important to recall that UN agencies and other organizations rely on PPPs to “improve global health, facilitate access to scientific information, and encourage the diffusion of climate change technologies”. And it’s for this reason, say the writers, that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development highlights their centrality in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At the same time, the intellectual property dimensions and implications of these efforts remain under-examined. Through selective case studies, this detailed and comprehensive work contributes to a better understanding of the relationships between PPPs and intellectual property. The relationship is considered within a global knowledge governance framework, that includes innovation, capacity-building, technological learning, and diffusion. Linking global governance of knowledge via intellectual property to the SDGs, it is the first book to chart the activities of PPPs at this important nexus at a time of considerable change. Of course, PPPs are now an essential feature of the global development landscape and what the editors call “a fixation in development discourse and practice”. The title is a first attempt to look more closely at PPPs and IP “within a more capacious knowledge” of “governance framework”. The contributors review this relationship with public health and other fields such as education, information and communications technologies (ICTs), libraries, agriculture and climate change. We found the work quite a heavy read but, with perseverance, the end results offer a fresh insight into one of the biggest issues we face today in global development challenges. Thank you very much for this important statement on these challenges for the 21st century, and for the final conclusions in chapter 19 on the triple interface containing Margaret Chon’s findings and suggestions on future directions. This important handbook was first published in 20th September 2018.

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107175839
    • length: 462 pages
    • dimensions: 261 x 183 x 28 mm
    • weight: 1.19kg
    • contains: 14 b/w illus. 3 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Charting the triple interface of public-private partnerships, global knowledge governance, and sustainable development goals Margaret Chon, Pedro Roffe and Ahmed Abdel-Latif
    Part I. Public Health:
    2. Public-private partnerships as models for new drug research and development: the future as now Frederick Abbott
    3. Driving innovation for global health through multi-stakeholder partnerships Anatole Krattiger, Thomas Bombelles and Ania Jedrusik
    4. Creating, managing, and advancing collaborations: the road to successful partnerships Katy M. Graef, Jennifer Dent and Amy Starr
    5. Patent pooling in public health Esteban Burrone
    6. Intellectual property in early-phase research public-private partnerships in the biomedical sector Hilde Stevens and Isabelle Huys
    Part II. Education, ICT and Libraries:
    7. A publisher perspective on a public-private partnership for access to biomedical information Jens Bammel
    8. A sustainable development agenda for the World Intellectual Property Organization: networked governance and public-private partnerships Sara Bannerman
    9. The Marrakesh Treaty, public-private partnerships, and access to copyrighted works by visually impaired persons Susan Isiko Štrba
    10. Intellectual property and public-private partner motivations: lessons from a digital library Melissa Levine
    Part III. Green Technologies and Agriculture:
    11. The rise of public-private partnerships in green technologies and intellectual property rights Ahmed Abdel-Latif
    12. Innovation law and policy choices for climate change-related public-private partnerships Joshua Sarnoff and Margaret Chon
    13. How do climate change and energy-related partnerships impact innovation and technology transfer? Ayşem Mert and Philipp Pattberg
    14. One size does not fit all: the role of the state and the private sector in the governing framework of geographical indications Irene Calboli and Delphine Marie-Vivienne
    Part IV. Governance and Institutional Design Perspectives:
    15. Public-private partnerships and technology sharing: existing models and future institutional designs Padmashree Gehl Sampath
    16. From the MDGs to the SDGs: cross-sector partnerships as avenues to development in the UN system David J. Maurrasse
    17. Sustainable development through a cross-regional research partnership Chidi Oguamanam and Jeremy De Beer
    18. Intellectual property, human rights and public-private partnerships Peter K. Yu
    Conclusions
    19. The triple interface: findings and future directions Margaret Chon.

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    The Cambridge Handbook of Public-Private Partnerships, Intellectual Property Governance, and Sustainable Development

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  • Editors

    Margaret Chon, Seattle University School of Law
    Margaret Chon is the Donald and Lynda Horowitz Professor for the Pursuit of Justice, and former Associate Dean for Research at Seattle University School of Law, where her current research explores the relationship of intellectual property to human and sustainable development.

    Pedro Roffe, International Center for Trade and Sustainable Development
    Pedro Roffe is a Senior Fellow at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development, where his work focuses on intellectual property, foreign investment, transfer of technology and international economic negotiations.

    Ahmed Abdel-Latif, International Renewable Energy Agency, Abu Dhabi
    Ahmed Abdel-Latif is the Chief, Office of the Director General, at the International Renewable Energy Agency. Previously, he was Senior Programme Manager for Innovation, Technology and Intellectual Property at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development.

    Contributors

    Margaret Chon, Pedro Roffe, Ahmed Abdel-Latif, Frederick Abbott, Anatole Krattiger, Thomas Bombelles, Ania Jedrusik, Katy M. Graef, Jennifer Dent, Amy Starr, Esteban Burrone, Hilde Stevens, Isabelle Huys, Jens Bammel, Sara Bannerman, Susan Isiko Štrba, Melissa Levine, Joshua Sarnoff, Ayşem Mert, Philipp Pattberg, Irene Calboli, Delphine Marie-Vivienne, Padmashree Gehl Sampath, David J. Maurrasse, Chidi Oguamanam, Jeremy De Beer, Peter K. Yu

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