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Agreeing and Implementing the Doha Round of the WTO

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John H. Jackson, Harald Hohmann, Peter Mandelson, Chiedu Osakwe, WTO Secretariat, Philippe Duponteil, Faizel Ismail, Ambassador Lilia R. Bautista, Asif H. Qureshi, David O'Sullivan, Knut Brünjes, Reinhard Quick, Karl M. Meessen, Paul de Waart, Eric White, Wolfgang Weiss, Debra Steger, Petina Gappah, Andreas Blüthner, Mitsuo Matsushita, Shinya Murase, Satoru Taira, Lutz Strack
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  • Date Published: February 2010
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511669118

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  • The Doha Round is the first major trade negotiation round under the WTO since the failure of the Seattle Ministerial in 1999. The Doha discussions and results will have a large impact on the future of international trade law. Leading scholars and practitioners from three continents comment on four such areas in this book. Firstly, poverty eradication, capacity building, and special and differential treatment are required to change for WTO law to be accepted globally; this may lead to a reinterpretation of WTO law. Secondly, the major trade policy concerns, the global concept of competition, and the impacts of trade facilitation and of sustainability of trade liberalization are examined. The third topic is the improvement of the dispute settlement through, for example, a relaxation of tensions between the judicial and diplomatic models. Finally, possible solutions for the balance between free trade, environmental protection and human rights are explored.

    • Clearly outlines why barriers to access to goods and services, and for implementing trade facilitation and sustainable trade, need to be removed
    • Clearly outlines why some aspects of WTO dispute settlement (e.g. transparency, increased access of developing countries) must improve
    • Clearly outlines why environmental protection, human rights and health are important
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '… an excellent survey of some important issues surrounding the Doha talks. … this book is a useful addition to an international trade policy collection. It provides essays on a broad range of topics and from a variety of perspectives. … it provides excellent detail and discussion for the advanced scholar.' International Journal of Legal Information

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2010
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511669118
    • contains: 3 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Preface John H. Jackson
    Introduction Harald Hohmann
    1a. We need to look ahead and to rebuild: a deal can still be salvaged from the ashes of Doha Peter Mandelson
    1b. The future of the Doha negotiations after the suspension: is all in vain? Chiedu Osakwe
    Part I. Development Policy of the WTO:
    2. Developmental aspects of the Doha Round of negotiations WTO Secretariat
    3a. Aspects of development policy in the Doha Round - EC perspective Philippe Duponteil
    3b. Assessment of the 6th ministerial Hong Kong Conference from a development perspective Faizel Ismail
    4. Capacity building and combating poverty in the WTO Ambassador Lilia R. Bautista
    5. Integrating development and S&D into the architecture of the WTO, through the operation of the Dispute Settlement system Asif H. Qureshi
    Part II. Trade Policy (Including Competition) and Trade Facilitation:
    6a. Trade policy objectives in the Doha Round: the EC perspective David O'Sullivan
    6b. Trade policy objectives in the final phase of the Doha round Knut Brünjes
    7. Further liberalization of trade in chemicals - can the DDA deliver? Reinhard Quick
    8. Trade facilitation within the Doha Round: a critical review of recent efforts of the WTO and other international organisations (1996–2006) Harald Hohmann
    9. Competition in the Doha Round: ICN accompanied convergence - instead of WTO imposed harmonization - of competition laws Karl M. Meessen
    10. The legal principle of integration in the Doha Round: embedding a social order in the global market Paul de Waart
    Part III. Reform of the Dispute Settlement:
    11. Reforming the Dispute Settlement System through practice Eric White
    12. Reforming the Dispute Settlement understanding Wolfgang Weiss
    13. The WTO Dispute Settlement system: jurisdiction, interpretation and remedies Debra Steger
    14. An evaluation of the role of legal aid in International Dispute resolution, with emphasis on the advisory centre on WTO law Petina Gappah
    Part IV. Social Rights, Health, and Environment:
    15. Trade and human rights at work: Next round please? Regulatory and cooperationist approaches in the context of the Doha Round Andreas Blüthner
    16. Food safety issues under WTO Agreements Mitsuo Matsushita
    17. Trade and the environment: with particular reference to climate change issues Shinya Murase
    18. Live with a quiet but uneasy status quo? An evolutionary role the Appellate Body can play in resolution of 'Trade and Environment' disputes Satoru Taira
    19. Health, environment and social standards in the Doha Round: comparison of the visions and reforms needed and the results achieved Lutz Strack
    20. Some personal conclusions of the 19 chapters Harald Hohmann.

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    Agreeing and Implementing the Doha Round of the WTO

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  • Editor

    Harald Hohmann, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt

    Contributors

    John H. Jackson, Harald Hohmann, Peter Mandelson, Chiedu Osakwe, WTO Secretariat, Philippe Duponteil, Faizel Ismail, Ambassador Lilia R. Bautista, Asif H. Qureshi, David O'Sullivan, Knut Brünjes, Reinhard Quick, Karl M. Meessen, Paul de Waart, Eric White, Wolfgang Weiss, Debra Steger, Petina Gappah, Andreas Blüthner, Mitsuo Matsushita, Shinya Murase, Satoru Taira, Lutz Strack

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