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Public Services and International Trade Liberalization
Human Rights and Gender Implications

$41.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge International Trade and Economic Law

  • Date Published: November 2014
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107471177

$ 41.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Does public service liberalization pose a threat to gender and human rights? Traditionally considered essential services provided by a state to its citizens, public services are often viewed as public goods which embody social values. Subjecting them to market ideology thus raises concerns that the intrinsic social nature of these services will be negated. Moreover, as those most likely to be reliant on public services, public service liberalization may also further marginalize women. Nevertheless, states continue to increasingly liberalize public services. Barnali Choudhury explores the implications of public service liberalization. Using primarily a legal approach, but drawing from case studies, empirical research and gender theories, she examines whether liberalization under the General Agreement on Trade in Services and other liberalization vehicles such as preferential trade and investment agreements compromise human rights and gender objectives.

    • Examines public service liberalization through a broader lens than simply GATS liberalization, thereby offering a more contextualized perspective on the key tools of public service liberalization
    • Grounds the analysis in a theoretical framework which offers a critical evaluation of the issues instead of simply a criticism
    • Views the issues in public service liberalization from both a human rights and gender perspective, highlighting how public service liberalization is more than simply a trade issue
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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2014
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107471177
    • length: 380 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.51kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus. 1 table
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Foundations:
    1. International economic law and human rights
    2. Public services
    3. Instruments for liberalizing public services
    Part II. Human Rights and Gendered Implications of Liberalization of Public Services:
    4. Liberalization of water services
    5. Liberalization of educational services
    6. Liberalization of health services
    7. Accounting for the differential implications of liberalized public services on developing countries and women
    Part III. The Future of Liberalization of Public Services:
    8. Should public services continue to be liberalized?
    9. Conclusion
    Index.

  • Author

    Barnali Choudhury, McGill University, Montréal
    Barnali Choudhury teaches at Queen Mary, University of London. She previously practised corporate law and international investment arbitration.

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