Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

The Solicitor General and the United States Supreme Court
Executive Branch Influence and Judicial Decisions

$119.00 (C)

  • Date Published: April 2012
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107015296

$ 119.00 (C)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The United States government, represented by the Office of the Solicitor General, appears before the Supreme Court more than any other litigant. The Office's link to the president, the arguments it makes before the Court, and its ability to alter the legal and policy landscape make it the most important Supreme Court litigant bar none. As such, scholars must understand the Office's role in Supreme Court decision making and, more importantly, its ability to influence the Court. This book examines whether and how the Office of the Solicitor General influences the United States Supreme Court. Combining archival data with recent innovations in the areas of matching and causal inference, the book finds that the Solicitor General influences every aspect of the Court's decision making process. From granting review to cases, selecting winning parties, writing opinions, and interpreting precedent, the Solicitor General's office influences the Court to behave in ways it otherwise would not.

    • Offers unique archival data that allows readers to see the private votes cast by justices on the Supreme Court
    • Examines research design that allows for causal inference (i.e. showing that the presence of the Solicitor General causes the Court to behave differently)
    • It examines whether and how the Office of the Solicitor General influences the United States Supreme Court
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2012
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107015296
    • length: 192 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 16 mm
    • weight: 0.43kg
    • contains: 36 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. The Solicitor General and the Supreme Court
    2. The Office of the Solicitor General: the finest law firm in the country
    3. Explanations for Solicitor General success
    4. Solicitor General influence and agenda setting
    5. Solicitor General influence and merits outcomes
    6. Solicitor General influence and briefs
    7. Solicitor General influence and legal doctrine
    8. Conclusion
    9. Appendices.

  • Authors

    Ryan C. Black, Michigan State University
    Ryan C. Black is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University where he teaches about the federal judiciary, with a particular emphasis on the United States Supreme Court and the United States Courts of Appeals. His work has been published in the Journal of Politics, Political Research Quarterly, the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, American Politics Research, Presidential Studies Quarterly, the Justice System Journal, Law and Social Inquiry and a variety of law reviews. He is also a co-author of Oral Arguments and Coalition Formation on the U.S. Supreme Court: A Deliberate Dialogue.

    Ryan J. Owens, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    Ryan J. Owens is a Lyons Family Faculty Scholar and Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin. His work analyzes the United States Supreme Court, the United States Courts of Appeals and American political institutions. His work has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, Political Research Quarterly, Judicature, the William and Mary Law Review, the Law and Society Review and the Justice System Journal.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×