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Arthropods of Tropical Forests
Spatio-Temporal Dynamics and Resource Use in the Canopy

$60.00 (C)

T. Lovejoy, Y. Basset, V. Novotny, S. Miller, R. Kitching, P. Hammond, H. Barrios, J. Holloway, R. Didham, N. Springate, U. Simon, M. Gossner, K. Linsenmair, C. Schulze, K. Fiedler, F. Koike, T. Nagamitsu, L. Sørensen, N. Winchester, V. Behan-Pelletier, B. De Dijn, T. Itioka, M. Kato, H. Kaliang, M. Ben Merdeck, S. Sakai, S. Mohamad, S. Yamane, A. Hamid, T. Inoue, D. Gruner, D. Polhemus, T. Wagner, J. Palacios-Vargas, G. Castaño-Meneses, J. Guerrero, C. da Fonseca, N. Stork, S. Stuntz, G. Zotz, A. Floren, K. Mody, H. Bardoz, K. Jaffe, J. Hernandez, W. Goitía, A. Osio, F. Osborn, H. Cerda, A. Arab, J. Rincones, R. Gajardo, L. Caraballo, C. Andara, H. Lopez, F. Ødegaard, C. Amédégnato, S. Kirmse, J. Adis, W. Morawetz, A. Prinzing, S. Woas, M. Shaw, D. Walter, H.-P. Aberlenc, H. Barrios, G. Curletti, T. Schowalter, L. Ganio, K. Hurley, L. Thalib, A. Dejean, B. Corbara, S. Ribeiro, D. Roubik, F. Gattesco, D. Janzen, M. Speight, J. Intachat, C. Khen, A. Chung
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  • Date Published: December 2008
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521087841

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About the Authors
  • Arthropods are the most diverse group of organisms on our planet, and the tropical rainforests represent the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems. This volume provides an overview of data collected during recent studies in Australia, Africa, Asia, and South America. The contributions focus on the distribution of arthropods and their use of resources in the rainforest canopies, providing a basis for comparison between the forest ecosystems of the main biogeographical regions. The temporal dynamics of arthropod communities, habitats and food selection are examined within and among tropical tree crowns, as are the effects of forest disturbance.

    • Brings together studies from the three main tropical biogeographical regions and allows a comparative approach
    • The first coherent, interpreted and comprehensive overview of this active research field with introductory and concluding chapters
    • Reviews the latest technological advances for accessing the tropical forest canopy
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "We must congratulate the editors and authors. Arthropods of Tropical Forests is a milestone publication. It will be of great value to many tropical invertebrate zoologists. Moreover, it also has much to offer to a broader audience, including plant ecologists and conservation biologists." Plant Science Bulletin

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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2008
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521087841
    • length: 492 pages
    • dimensions: 246 x 189 x 25 mm
    • weight: 0.87kg
    • contains: 99 b/w illus. 84 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword
    Preface
    Part I. Arthropods of Tropical Canopies: Current Themes of Research:
    1. Canopy entomology, an expanding field of natural science
    2. Methodological advances and limitations in canopy entomology
    3. Vertical stratification of arthropod assemblages
    4. Determinants of temporal variation in community structure
    5. Herbivore assemblages and their food resources
    Part II. Vertical Stratification in Tropical Forests:
    6. Distribution of ants and bark-beetles in crowns of tropical oaks
    7. Vertical and temporal diversity of a species-rich moth taxon in Borneo
    8. Canopy foliage structure and flight density of butterflies and birds in Sarawak
    9. Stratification of the spider fauna in a Tanzanian forest
    10. Fauna of suspended soils in an Ongokea gore tree in Gabon
    11. Vertical stratification of flying insects in a Surinam lowland rainforest
    Part III. Temporal Patterns in Tropical Canopies:
    12. Insect responses to general flowering in Sarawak
    13. Arthropod assemblages across a long chronosequence in the Hawaiian islands
    14. Seasonality of canopy beetles in Uganda
    15. Seasonality and community composition of springtails in Mexican forests
    16. Seasonal variation of canopy arthropods in Central Amazon
    17. Arthropod seasonality in tree crowns with different epiphyte loads
    Part IV. Resource Use and Host Specificity in Tropical Canopies:
    18. How do beetle assemblages respond to anthropogenic disturbance? 19. Organization of arthropod assemblages in African savanna trees
    20. Flower ecology in the Neotropics: a flower-ant love-hate relationship
    21. Taxonomic composition and host specificity of phytophagous beetles in a dry forest in Panama
    22. Microhabit distribution of forest grasshoppers in the Amazon
    23. Flowering events and beetle diversity in Venezuela
    Part V. Synthesis: Spatio-Temporal Dynamics and Resource Use in Tropical Canopies:
    24. Habitat use and stratification of Collembola and oribatid mites
    25. Insect herbivores feeding on conspecific seedlings and trees
    26. Hallowed hideaways: basal mites in tree hollows and allied habitats
    27. Arthropod diel activity and stratification
    28. Diel, seasonal and disturbance-induced variation in invertebrate assemblages
    29. Tree relatedness and the similarity of insect assemblages: pushing the limits?
    30. A review of mosaics of dominant ants in rainforests and plantations
    31. Insect herbivores in the canopies of savannas and rainforests
    32. Canopy flowers and certainty: loose niches revisited
    33. How polyphagous are Costa Rican dry forest saturniid caterpillars?
    34. Influences of forest management on insects
    35. Conclusion: arthropods, canopies and interpretable patterns
    Part VI. References
    Index.

  • Editors

    Yves Basset, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama
    Yves Basset is a Tupper Fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in the Republic of Panama.

    Roger Kitching, Griffith University, Queensland

    Scott Miller, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC

    Vojtech Novotny, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague
    Roger Kitching is Professor of Ecology in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.

    Contributors

    T. Lovejoy, Y. Basset, V. Novotny, S. Miller, R. Kitching, P. Hammond, H. Barrios, J. Holloway, R. Didham, N. Springate, U. Simon, M. Gossner, K. Linsenmair, C. Schulze, K. Fiedler, F. Koike, T. Nagamitsu, L. Sørensen, N. Winchester, V. Behan-Pelletier, B. De Dijn, T. Itioka, M. Kato, H. Kaliang, M. Ben Merdeck, S. Sakai, S. Mohamad, S. Yamane, A. Hamid, T. Inoue, D. Gruner, D. Polhemus, T. Wagner, J. Palacios-Vargas, G. Castaño-Meneses, J. Guerrero, C. da Fonseca, N. Stork, S. Stuntz, G. Zotz, A. Floren, K. Mody, H. Bardoz, K. Jaffe, J. Hernandez, W. Goitía, A. Osio, F. Osborn, H. Cerda, A. Arab, J. Rincones, R. Gajardo, L. Caraballo, C. Andara, H. Lopez, F. Ødegaard, C. Amédégnato, S. Kirmse, J. Adis, W. Morawetz, A. Prinzing, S. Woas, M. Shaw, D. Walter, H.-P. Aberlenc, H. Barrios, G. Curletti, T. Schowalter, L. Ganio, K. Hurley, L. Thalib, A. Dejean, B. Corbara, S. Ribeiro, D. Roubik, F. Gattesco, D. Janzen, M. Speight, J. Intachat, C. Khen, A. Chung

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