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Molecular Evolution and Adaptive Radiation

$221.00 (P)

Thomas J. Givnish, Kenneth J. Sytsma, Bruce G. Baldwin, Mark S. Springer, John A. W. Kirsch, Judd A. Chase, John K. Colbourne, Paul D. N. Hebert, Derek J. Taylor, Inés Horovitz, Axel Meye, Spencer C. H. Barrett, Sean W. Graham, Thomas J. Givnish, Kenneth J. Sytsma, James F. Smith, William J. Hahn, David H. Benzing, Elizabeth M. Burkhardt, François-Joseph Lapointe, Mark W. Chase, Jeffrey D. Palmer, Alfried P. Vogler, Peter N. Reinthal, Axel Mey, Javier Francisco-Ortega, Daniel J. Crawford, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, Robert K. Jansen, Jeffrey R. Hapeman, Kenneth Inoue, Ann K. Sakai, Stephen G. Weller, Warren L. Wagner, Pamela S. Soltis, Michael P. Kambysellis, Elysse M. Craddock, Eric B. Taylor, James D. McPhail, Dalph Schluter, Todd Jackman, Jonathan B. Losos, Allan Larson, Kevin de Queiros, Andrew B. Smith, D. T. J. Littlewood, Amy R. McCune
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  • Date Published: August 1997
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521573290

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About the Authors
  • Molecular Evolution and Adaptive Radiation surveys recent advances in the study of adaptive radiation by bringing together a set of international experts investigating a wide range of organisms in a variety of geographic settings. Givnish and Sytsma show how family trees derived from molecular characters can be used to analyze the origin and pattern of ecological and morphological diversification within a lineage in a noncircular fashion. They synthesize the recent explosion of research in this area, involving organisms as diverse as epiphytic and terrestrial orchids, water hyacinths, African cichlids, New World monkeys, tropical fruit bats, carnivorous bromeliads, Hawaiian silverswords and fruit flies, North American Daphnia, Caribbean anoles, Canadian sticklebacks, and Australian marsupials. This volume will be of interest to graduate students and professional scientists in ecology, evolutionary biology, systematics, and biogeography.

    • An international group of scientists discuss adaptive radiation
    • The authors discuss the use of molecular systematics (comparative molecular genetics) to give a more objective account of how groups of organisms are related
    • Allows several key questions at the interface of ecology, evolutionary biology, systematics, and biogeography to be addressed satisfactorily for the first time
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "The editors have put together a very handsome volume with an impressive cast of characters to summarize the proceedings of a meeting on molecular evolution and adaptive radiations...The incorporation of molecular data and phylogenetic techniques in the study of adaptive radiations is a welcome and necessary development and this book demonstrates the potential this endeavor holds for evolutionary biology." Rob DeSalle, The Quarterly Review of Biology

    "The editors have put together a very handsome volume with an impressive cast of characters (both authors and study systems) to summarize the proceedings of a meeting on molecular evolution...The incorporation of molecular data and phylogenetic techniques in the study of adaptive radiations is a welcome and necessary development and this book demonstrates the potential this endeavor holds for evolutionary biology." American Journal of Botany

    "The editors of Molecular Evolution and Adaptive Radiation, Tom Givnish and Ken Sytsma, have mixed fascinating case studies of adaptive radiations in a diversity of taxa with a very particular point of view regarding this ill-defined evolutionary process...a truly thought-provoking and significant book. Anyone interested in visiting or revisiting this centerpiece issue in evolutionary biology would do well to start here." American Journal of Botany

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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 1997
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521573290
    • length: 638 pages
    • dimensions: 260 x 182 x 32 mm
    • weight: 1.31kg
    • contains: 160 b/w illus. 4 colour illus. 40 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    List of Contributors
    Part I. Introduction:
    1. Adaptive radiation and molecular evolution: concepts and research issues Thomas J. Givnish
    2. Homoplasy in molecular vs. morphological data: the likelihood of correct phylogenetic inference Thomas J. Givnish, and Kenneth J. Sytsma
    Part II. Integrative Studies:
    3. Adaptive radiation of the Hawaiian silversword alliance: congruence and conflict of phylogenetic evidence from molecular and non-molecular investigations Bruce G. Baldwin
    4. The chronicle of marsupial evolution Mark S. Springer, John A. W. Kirsch, and Judd A. Chase
    5. Evolutionary origins of phenotypic diversity in Daphnia John K. Colbourne, Paul D. N. Hebert, and Derek J. Taylor
    6. Evolutionary trends in the ecology of New World monkeys inferred from a combined phylogenetic analysis of nuclear, mitochondrial, and morphological data Inés Horovitz, and Axel Meye
    7. Adaptive radiation in the aquatic plant family Pontederiaceae: insights from phylogenetic analysis Spencer C. H. Barrett, and Sean W. Graham
    8. Molecular evolution and adaptive radiation in Brocchinia (Bromeliaceae: Pitcairnioideae) atop tepuis of the Guayana Shield Thomas J. Givnish, Kenneth J. Sytsma, James F. Smith, William J. Hahn, David H. Benzing, and Elizabeth M. Burkhardt
    Part III. Convergence:
    9. You aren't always what you eat: evolution of nectar-feeding among Old World fruitbats (Megachiroptera: Pteropodidae) John A. W. Kirsch, and François-Joseph Lapointe
    10. Chloroplast DNA restriction sites and floral versus non-floral characters in the obligate twig epiphytes in subtribe Oncidiinae (Orchidaceae) Mark W. Chase, and Jeffrey D. Palmer
    11. Adaptation, cladogenesis, and the evolution of habitat association in North American tiger beetles: a phylogenetic perspective Alfried P. Vogler
    Part IV. Rapid Radiations:
    12. Molecular phylogenetic tests of sympatric speciation models in Lake Malawi cichlid fishes Peter N. Reinthal, and Axel Mey
    13. A rapid adaptive radiation due to a key innovation in Aquilegia Scott Hodges
    14. Origin and evolution of Argyranthemum (Asteraceae: Anthemideae) in Macaronesia Javier Francisco-Ortega, Daniel J. Crawford, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, and Robert K. Jansen
    Part V. Reproductive Strategies:
    15. Floral diversification, pollination biology, and molecular evolution in Platanthera (Orchidaceae) Jeffrey R. Hapeman, and Kenneth Inoue
    16. Phylogenetic perspectives on the evolution of dioecy: adaptive radiation in the endemic Hawaiian genera Schiedea and Alsinodendron (Caryophyllaceae: Alsinoideae) Ann K. Sakai, Stephen G. Weller, Warren L. Wagner, and Pamela S. Soltis
    17. Ecological and reproductive shifts in the diversification of the endemic Hawaiian Drosophila Michael P. Kambysellis, and Elysse M. Craddock
    Part VI. Character Divergence and Community Assembly:
    18. History of ecological selection in sticklebacks - uniting experimental and phylogenetic approaches Eric B. Taylor, James D. McPhail, and Dalph Schluter
    19. Phylogenetic studies of convergent adaptive radiations in Caribbean Anolis lizards Todd Jackman, Jonathan B. Losos, Allan Larson, and Kevin de Queiros
    Part VII. Macroevolutionary Patterns:
    20. Molecular and morphological evolution during the post-Palaeozoic diversification of echinoids Andrew B. Smith, and D. T. J. Littlewood
    21. How fast is speciation: molecular, geological and phylogenetic evidences from adaptive radiations of fish Amy R. McCune
    Index.

  • Editors

    Thomas J. Givnish, University of Wisconsin, Madison

    Kenneth J. Sytsma, University of Wisconsin, Madison

    Contributors

    Thomas J. Givnish, Kenneth J. Sytsma, Bruce G. Baldwin, Mark S. Springer, John A. W. Kirsch, Judd A. Chase, John K. Colbourne, Paul D. N. Hebert, Derek J. Taylor, Inés Horovitz, Axel Meye, Spencer C. H. Barrett, Sean W. Graham, Thomas J. Givnish, Kenneth J. Sytsma, James F. Smith, William J. Hahn, David H. Benzing, Elizabeth M. Burkhardt, François-Joseph Lapointe, Mark W. Chase, Jeffrey D. Palmer, Alfried P. Vogler, Peter N. Reinthal, Axel Mey, Javier Francisco-Ortega, Daniel J. Crawford, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, Robert K. Jansen, Jeffrey R. Hapeman, Kenneth Inoue, Ann K. Sakai, Stephen G. Weller, Warren L. Wagner, Pamela S. Soltis, Michael P. Kambysellis, Elysse M. Craddock, Eric B. Taylor, James D. McPhail, Dalph Schluter, Todd Jackman, Jonathan B. Losos, Allan Larson, Kevin de Queiros, Andrew B. Smith, D. T. J. Littlewood, Amy R. McCune

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