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Horizontal Gene Transfer in the Evolution of Pathogenesis

$118.00 ( ) USD

Part of Advances in Molecular and Cellular Microbiology

Jeffrey G. Lawrence, Heather Hendrickson, Xavier Didelot, Daniel Falush, Harald Brüssow, Roger W. Hendrix, Sherwood R. Casjens, Tobias Ölschläger, Jörg Hacker, Dawn L. Arnold, Robert W. Jackson, Sébastien Lemire, Nara Figueroa-Bossi, Lionello Bossi, Elisabeth Carniel, Barbara Albiger, Christel Blomberg, Jessica Dagerhamm, Staffan Normark, Brigitta Henriques-Normark, Richard P. Novick, Wolfgang Witte, Jan O. Andersson, Andrés Moya, Amparo Latorre
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  • Date Published: June 2008
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511406003

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About the Authors
  • Horizontal gene transfer is a major driving force in the evolution of many bacterial pathogens. The development of high-throughput sequencing tools and more sophisticated genomic and proteomic techniques in recent years has resulted in a better understanding of this phenomenon. Written by leading experts in the field, this edited volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers and provides an overview of current knowledge relating to the evolution of microbial pathogenicity. This volume provides an overview of the mechanisms and biological consequences of the genome rearrangements resulting from horizontal gene transfer, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, as well as overviews of the key mobile genetic elements involved. Subsequent chapters focus on paradigms for the evolution of important bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella enterica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The influence of socioeconomic parameters in the dissemination of transferable elements, such as antibiotic resistant genes in bacteria is also discussed.

    • Written by a team of international experts in the field
    • Deals with both eukaryotic and prokaryotic gene transfer
    • The influence of socio-economics parameters in the dissemination of transferable elements is covered
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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2008
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511406003
    • contains: 12 b/w illus. 17 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Theoretical Considerations on the Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens:
    1. Genomes in motion - gene transfer as a catalyst for genome change Jeffrey G. Lawrence and Heather Hendrickson
    2. Bacterial recombination in vivo Xavier Didelot and Daniel Falush
    Part II. Mobile Genetic Elements in Bacterial Evolution:
    3. Phage-bacterium co-evolution and its implication for bacterial pathogenesis Harald Brüssow
    4. Phage conversion - driving forces in the development and spread of bacterial pathogens Roger W. Hendrix and Sherwood R. Casjens
    5. Genomic islands in the bacterial chromosome – paradigms of microevolution in quantum leaps Tobias Ölschläger and Jörg Hacker
    Part III. Paradigms of Bacterial Evolution:
    6. Genomic islands in plant-pathogenic bacteria Dawn L. Arnold and Robert W. Jackson
    7. Prophage contribution to salmonella virulence and diversity Sébastien Lemire, Nara Figueroa-Bossi and Lionello Bossi
    8. Pathogenic yersiniae: stepwise gain of virulence due to sequential acquisition of mobile genetic elements Elisabeth Carniel
    9. Genomic or pathogenicity islands in streptococcus pneumoniae Barbara Albiger, Christel Blomberg, Jessica Dagerhamm, Staffan Normark and Brigitta Henriques-Normark
    10. The mobile genetic elements of staphylococcus aureus Richard P. Novick
    11. Influence of human lifestyle on dissemination of transferable elements Wolfgang Witte
    Part IV. Interkingdom Transfer and Endosymbiosis:
    12. Eukaryotic gene transfer: adaptation and replacements Jan O. Andersson
    13. Lessons in evolution from genome reduction in bacterial endosymbionts Andrés Moya and Amparo Latorre.

  • Editors

    Michael Hensel, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
    Michael Hensel is currently Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Erlangen in Germany.

    Herbert Schmidt, Universität Hohenheim, Stuttgart
    Herbert Schmidt is currently Professor of Food Microbiology at the University of Hohenheim in Germany.

    Contributors

    Jeffrey G. Lawrence, Heather Hendrickson, Xavier Didelot, Daniel Falush, Harald Brüssow, Roger W. Hendrix, Sherwood R. Casjens, Tobias Ölschläger, Jörg Hacker, Dawn L. Arnold, Robert W. Jackson, Sébastien Lemire, Nara Figueroa-Bossi, Lionello Bossi, Elisabeth Carniel, Barbara Albiger, Christel Blomberg, Jessica Dagerhamm, Staffan Normark, Brigitta Henriques-Normark, Richard P. Novick, Wolfgang Witte, Jan O. Andersson, Andrés Moya, Amparo Latorre

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