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Neurobiology of Grooming Behavior

$115.00 ( ) USD

M. Frances Stilwell, John C. Fentress, Michael H. Ferkin, Stuart T. Leonard, Carisa L. Bergner, Amanda N. Smolinsky, Brett D. Dufour, Justin L. LaPorte, Peter C. Hart, Rupert J. Egan, Allan V. Kalueff, Sergio M. Pellis, Vivien C. Pellis, Marie-Claude Audet, Sonia Goulet, Rachel A. Hill, Wah Chin Boon, Hee-Sup Shin, Daesoo Kim, Hae-Young Koh, R. Lalonde, C. Strazielle, Howard Casey Cromwell, Joseph P. Garner, Lara J. Hoppe, Jonathan Ipser, Christine Lochner, Kevin G. F. Thomas, Dan J. Stein, Srinivas Singisetti, Sam R. Chamberlain, Naomi A. Fineberg
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  • Date Published: April 2010
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511685866

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About the Authors
  • Grooming is among the most evolutionary ancient and highly represented behaviours in many animal species. It represents a significant proportion of an animal's total activity and between 30-50% of their waking hours. Recent research has demonstrated that grooming is regulated by specific brain circuits and is sensitive to stress, as well as to pharmacologic compounds and genetic manipulation, making it ideal for modelling affective disorders that arise as a function of stressful environments, such as stress and post-traumatic stress disorder. Over a series of 12 chapters that introduce and explicate the field of grooming research and its significance for the human and animal brain, this book covers the breadth of grooming animal models while simultaneously providing sufficient depth in introducing the concepts and translational approaches to grooming research. Written primarily for graduates and researchers within the neuroscientific community.

    • Covers the entire span of current research into grooming behaviour, giving the reader an overview of the current topics of interest
    • Includes a wide spectrum of data from animal experimentation to clinical psychiatry, providing translational parallels for scientists and clinicians
    • Demonstrates the relevance of grooming behaviour to animal and human neurobiology including the modelling of affective disorders such as anxiety and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder)
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "Neurobiology of Grooming Behavior does contain solid contributions that should be of obvious interest to psychologists working in the areas of neuropsychology and neurophysiology. It is readily apparent that grooming-related behaviors intersect with my own field, comparative psychology, in various ways. the book reveals interesting links shared among grooming behavior, biological factors, and neurological disorders. Though the book is aimed at researchers already working on animal grooming and its possible links to neuropsychological disorders, it will also be of interest to comparative psychologists."
    Michael J. Boisvert, PsycCRITIQUES

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2010
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511685866
    • contains: 25 b/w illus. 17 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    1. Grooming, sequencing, and beyond: how it all began M. Frances Stilwell and John C. Fentress
    2. Self-grooming as a form of olfactory communication in meadow voles and prairie voles (Microtus spp.) Michael H. Ferkin and Stuart T. Leonard
    3. Phenotyping and genetics of rodent grooming and barbering: utility for experimental neuroscience research Carisa L. Bergner, Amanda N. Smolinsky, Brett D. Dufour, Justin L. LaPorte, Peter C. Hart, Rupert J. Egan and Allan V. Kalueff
    4. Social play, social grooming and the regulation of social relationships Sergio M. Pellis and Vivien C. Pellis
    5. Grooming syntax as a sensitive measure of the effects of subchronic PCP treatment in rats Marie-Claude Audet and Sonia Goulet
    6. Modulatory effects of estrogens on grooming and related behaviours Rachel A. Hill and Wah Chin Boon
    7. Lack of barbering behaviour in the phospholipase Cβ1 mutant mice, a model animal for schizophrenia Hee-Sup Shin, Daesoo Kim and Hae-Young Koh
    8. Grooming after cerebellar, basal ganglia, and neocortical lesions R. Lalonde and C. Strazielle
    9. Striatal implementation of action sequences and more: grooming chains, inhibitory gating and relative reward effect Howard Casey Cromwell
    10. An ethological analysis of barbering behaviour Brett D. Dufour and Joseph P. Garner
    11. Should there be a category: 'grooming disorders'? Lara J. Hoppe, Jonathan Ipser, Christine Lochner, Kevin G. F. Thomas and Dan J. Stein
    12. Neurobiology of trichotillomania Srinivas Singisetti, Sam R. Chamberlain and Naomi A. Fineberg
    Index.

  • Editors

    Allan V. Kalueff, Tulane University, Louisiana
    Allan V. Kalueff is professor of neuroscience in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Georgetown University Medical School. He publishes actively on models of drug-drug and drug-receptor interactions, theories of brain disorders and their therapy, and complex interplay between cognitive, motivational and genetic bases of animal behavior.

    Justin L. La Porte, National Institute of Mental Health, Washington DC
    Carisa L. Bergner is a researcher in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Georgetown University Medical School. Her research currently involves mouse and zebrafish models of stress and depression.

    Carisa L. Bergner, National Institute of Mental Health, Washington DC
    Justin L. La Porte holds a position at the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. His research employs behavioral pharmacology and molecular genetics approaches to elucidate the pathogenetic mechanisms of psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, with a specific focus on the role of serotonin transporter.

    Contributors

    M. Frances Stilwell, John C. Fentress, Michael H. Ferkin, Stuart T. Leonard, Carisa L. Bergner, Amanda N. Smolinsky, Brett D. Dufour, Justin L. LaPorte, Peter C. Hart, Rupert J. Egan, Allan V. Kalueff, Sergio M. Pellis, Vivien C. Pellis, Marie-Claude Audet, Sonia Goulet, Rachel A. Hill, Wah Chin Boon, Hee-Sup Shin, Daesoo Kim, Hae-Young Koh, R. Lalonde, C. Strazielle, Howard Casey Cromwell, Joseph P. Garner, Lara J. Hoppe, Jonathan Ipser, Christine Lochner, Kevin G. F. Thomas, Dan J. Stein, Srinivas Singisetti, Sam R. Chamberlain, Naomi A. Fineberg

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