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Neuronal Mechanisms of Memory Formation
Concepts of Long-term Potentiation and Beyond

$49.00 ( ) USD

Christian Hölscher, Wickliffe C. Abraham, Michael T. Rogan, Marc G. Weisskopf, Yan-You Huang, Eric R. Kandel, Joseph E. LeDoux, Stephen Maren, Kathryn J. Jeffrey, Fanella Pike, Sturla Molden, Ole Paulson, Edvard I. Moser, Mouna Maroun, Dan Yaniv, Gal Richter-Levin, Matthias H. J. Munk, John Lisman, Ole Jensen, Michael Kahana, Edmund T. Rolls, Jill C. McEachern, Christopher A. Shaw, Louis D. Matzel, Tracey J. Shors, Donald P. Cain, Gregory M. Rose, David M. Diamond, Neill McNaughton, Collin R. Park, Michael J. Puls, Yoon H. Cho, Howard B. Eichenbaum, Paul F. Chapman, Sabrina Davis, Serge Laroche, Timothy V. P. Bliss
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  • Date Published: March 2011
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511825835

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  • Long-term potentiation (LTP) is the most dominant model for neuronal changes that might encode memory. LTP is an elegant concept that meets many criteria set up by theoreticians long before the model's discovery, and also fits the anatomical data of learning-dependent synapse changes. Since the discovery of LTP, the question has remained regarding how closely LTP produced in vitro by artificial stimulation of neurons actually models putative learning-induced synaptic changes. A number of recent investigations have tried to correlate synaptic changes observed after learning with changes produced by artificial stimulation of neurons. Some of these studies have failed to find a correlation between the two forms of synaptic plasticity, signalling a need to discuss the concept of LTP and possible alternate processes that could fit the available data. This book presents a selection of ideas that range from supporters of the LTP theory to different novel concepts that have yet to be investigated. This volume will prepare the ground for research in this area in the new millennium.

    • Discusses topics that are currently popular areas of research in neuroscience such as Long Term Potentiation (LTP), synaptic plasticity, and memory formation
    • There is no up-to-date book covering this topic
    • Includes contributions from leading researchers in the field from all over the world
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "...this volume can be recommended for those who wish to succinctly survey the current state of science... This book offers a timely collection of well-written articles..." Timothy J. Teyler, Quarterly Review of Biology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2011
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511825835
    • contains: 66 b/w illus. 6 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    General Introduction: Long-term potentiation as a model for learning mechanisms: 'the story so far' Christian Hölscher
    Part I. LTP In Vitro and in Vivo: How Can We Fine-Tune the Current Models for Memory Formation?:
    1. Persisting with LTP as a memory mechanism: clues from variations in LTP maintenance Wickliffe C. Abraham
    2. LTP in the amygdala: implications for memory Michael T. Rogan, Marc G. Weisskopf, Yan-You Huang, Eric R. Kandel and Joseph E. LeDoux
    3. Multiple roles for synaptic plasticity in Pavlovian fear conditioning Stephen Maren
    4. Plasticity of the hippocampal cellular representation of space Kathryn J. Jeffrey
    Part II. There is More to the Picture than LTP: Theta or Gamma Oscillations in the Brain and the Facilitation of Synaptic Plasticity:
    5. Synaptic potentiation by natural patterns of activity in the hippocampus: implications for memory formation Fenella Pike, Sturla Molden, Ole Paulsen and Edvard I. Moser
    6. Plasticity in local neuronal circuits: in-vivo evidence from rat hippocampus and amygdala Mouna Maroun, Dan Yaniv and Gal Richter-Levin
    7. Theta-facilitated induction of LTP: a better model for memory formation? Christian Hölscher
    8. Neuronal processing of information in the neocortex and the role of gamma-oscillations in perception and memory formation Matthias H. J. Munk
    Part III. Making Models from Empirical Data of Synaptic Plasticity:
    9. Towards a physiological explanation of behavioural data on human memory: the role of theta-gamma oscillations and NMDAR-dependent LTP John Lisman, Ole Jensen and Michael Kahana
    10. Neuronal networks, synaptic plasticity, and memory systems in primates Edmund T. Rolls
    11. Revisiting the LTP orthodoxy: plasticity versus pathology Jill C. McEachern and Christopher A. Shaw
    12. Long-term potentiation and associative learning: can the mechanism subserve the process? Louis D. Matzel and Tracey J. Shors
    Part IV. Setting the Stage for Memory Formation: Stress, Arousal and Attention:
    13. Strategies for studying the role of LTP in spatial learning: what do we know? Where should we go? Donald P. Cain
    14. What studies in old rats tell us about the role of LTP in learning Gregory M. Rose and David M. Diamond
    15. Implications of the neuropsychology of anxiety for the functional role of LTP in the hippocampus Neill McNaughton
    16. Differential effects of stress on hippocampal and amygdaloid LTP: insight into the neurobiology of traumatic memories David M. Diamond, Collin R. Park, Michael J. Puls and Gregory M. Rose
    Part V. Transgenic Mice as Tools to Unravel the Mechanisms of Memory Formation:
    17. In vivo recording of single cells in behaving transgenic mice Yoon H. Cho and Howard B. Eichenbaum
    18. Understanding synaptic plasticity and learning through genetically modified animals Paul F. Chapman
    19. What can gene activation tell us about synaptic plasticity and the mechanisms underlying the encoding of the memory trace Sabrina Davis and Serge Laroche
    Conclusions and future targets Christian Hölscher, Gal Richter-Levin and Timothy V. P. Bliss.

  • Editor

    Christian Hölscher, University of Oxford

    Contributors

    Christian Hölscher, Wickliffe C. Abraham, Michael T. Rogan, Marc G. Weisskopf, Yan-You Huang, Eric R. Kandel, Joseph E. LeDoux, Stephen Maren, Kathryn J. Jeffrey, Fanella Pike, Sturla Molden, Ole Paulson, Edvard I. Moser, Mouna Maroun, Dan Yaniv, Gal Richter-Levin, Matthias H. J. Munk, John Lisman, Ole Jensen, Michael Kahana, Edmund T. Rolls, Jill C. McEachern, Christopher A. Shaw, Louis D. Matzel, Tracey J. Shors, Donald P. Cain, Gregory M. Rose, David M. Diamond, Neill McNaughton, Collin R. Park, Michael J. Puls, Yoon H. Cho, Howard B. Eichenbaum, Paul F. Chapman, Sabrina Davis, Serge Laroche, Timothy V. P. Bliss

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