Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist
Look Inside Representations of Vision

Representations of Vision
Trends and Tacit Assumptions in Vision Research

$47.99 (C)

E. Bienenstock, A. Gorea, E. H. Adelson, E. P. Simoncelli, W. T. Freeman, A. B. Watson, J. G. Daugman, R. Doursat, Y. Frégnac, M. F. Bear, C. M. Gray, A. K. Engel, P. Konig, W. Singer, E. Peterhans, R. von der Heydt, W. T. Newsome, C. D. Salzman, C. M. Murasugi, K. H. Britten, Y. Miyashita, N. Masui, S. Higuchi, J. Findlay, Z. Kapoula, C. Kennard, H. Coolewijn, J. van der Steen, L. J. van Rijn, F. A. Miles, U. Schwarz, C. Busettini, J. A. M. Van Gisbergen, A. J. Van Opstal, A. W. A. Minken, M. Imbert, S. Klein, C. W. Tyler, S. Anstis, P. Cavanagh, S. Ullman, H. B. Barlow, B. Julesz
View all contributors
  • Date Published: June 2009
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521115056

$ 47.99 (C)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This stimulating volume on vision extends well beyond the traditional areas of vision research and places the subject in a much broader philosophical context. The emphasis throughout is to integrate and illuminate the visual process. The first three parts of the volume provide authoritative overviews on computational vision and neural networks, on the neurophysiology of visual cortex processing, and on eye-movement research. Each of these parts illustrates how different research perspectives may jointly solve fundamental problems related to the efficiency of visual perception, to the relationship between vision and eye-movements and to the neurophysiological 'codes' underlying our visual perceptions. In the fourth part, leading vision scientists introduce the reader to some major philosophical problems in vision research such as the nature of 'ultimate' codes for perceptual events, the duality of psycho-physics, the bases of visual recognition and the paradigmatic foundations of computer-vision research.

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2009
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521115056
    • length: 364 pages
    • dimensions: 244 x 170 x 19 mm
    • weight: 0.58kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Acknowledgements
    Part I. Visual Pyramids and Neural Networks E. Bienenstock and A. Gorea:
    1. Pyramids and multiscale representations E. H. Adelson, E. P. Simoncelli and W. T. Freeman
    2. Multidimensional pyramids in vision and video A. B. Watson
    3. Self-similar oriented wavelet pyramids: conjectures about neural non-orthogonality J. G. Daugman
    4. Issues of representation in neural networks E. Bienenstock and R. Doursat
    Part II. Visual Cortical Processing: From Perception to Memory Y. Frégnac and A. Gorea:
    5. Recent progress toward an understanding of experience-dependent visual cortical plasticity at the molecular level M. F. Bear
    6. Synchronous neuronal oscillations in cat visual cortex: functional implications C. M. Gray, A. K. Engel, P. Konig and W. Singer
    7. How many cycles make an oscillation? Y. Frégnac
    8. Elements of form perception in monkey prestriate cortex E. Peterhans and R. von der Heydt
    9. Manipulating perceptual decisions by microstimulation of extrastriate visual cortex W. T. Newsome, C. D. Salzman, C. M. Murasugi and K. H. Britten
    10. Primal long-term memory in the primate temporal cortex: linkage between visual perception and memory Y. Miyashita, N. Masui and S. Higuchi
    Part III. Eye Movement and Vision J. Findlay and Z. Kapoula:
    11. The effect of cortical lesions on visuo-motor processing in man C. Kennard
    12. Binocular eye-movements and depth perception H. Coolewijn, J. van der Steen and L. J. van Rijn
    13. The parsing of optic flow by the primate oculomotor system F. A. Miles, U. Schwarz and C. Busettini
    14. Current views on the visuo-motor interface of the saccadic system J. A. M. Van Gisbergen, A. J. Van Opstal and A. W. A. Minken
    Part IV. Tacit Assumptions in Vision Research A. Gorea and M. Imbert:
    15. Thoughts on the specific nerve energy A. Gorea
    16. The duality of psycho-physics S. Klein
    17. Some tacit assumptions in visual psychophysics C. W. Tyler
    18. Hidden assumptions in seeing shape from shading and apparent motion S. Anstis
    19. What's up in top-down processing? P. Cavanagh
    20. Tacit assumptions in the computational study of vision S. Ullman
    21. Vision tells you more than 'what is where' H. B. Barlow
    22. Some strategic questions in visual perception B. Julesz.

  • Editors

    Andrei Gorea

    Yves Fregnac

    Zoi Kapoula

    John Findlay

    Contributors

    E. Bienenstock, A. Gorea, E. H. Adelson, E. P. Simoncelli, W. T. Freeman, A. B. Watson, J. G. Daugman, R. Doursat, Y. Frégnac, M. F. Bear, C. M. Gray, A. K. Engel, P. Konig, W. Singer, E. Peterhans, R. von der Heydt, W. T. Newsome, C. D. Salzman, C. M. Murasugi, K. H. Britten, Y. Miyashita, N. Masui, S. Higuchi, J. Findlay, Z. Kapoula, C. Kennard, H. Coolewijn, J. van der Steen, L. J. van Rijn, F. A. Miles, U. Schwarz, C. Busettini, J. A. M. Van Gisbergen, A. J. Van Opstal, A. W. A. Minken, M. Imbert, S. Klein, C. W. Tyler, S. Anstis, P. Cavanagh, S. Ullman, H. B. Barlow, B. Julesz

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×