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Spatial Cognition, Spatial Perception
Mapping the Self and Space

$89.99 (C)

F. L. Dolins, R. W. Mitchell, K. Cheng, E. Menzel, C. Thinus-Blanc, V. Chabanne, L. Tommasi, P. Peruch, J. Vauclair, T. Collett, P. Graham, S. D. Healy, V. A. Braithwaite, P. A. Garber, C. Menzel, T. Wynn, L. Rehbein, S. Schettler, R. Killiany, M. Moss, E. Hoban, A. Arleo, L. Ronde-Reig, M. Sheets-Johnstone, L. Krubitzer, E. Disbrow, S. H. Creem-Regehr, A. Iriki, W. D. Hopkins, C. Cantalupo, R. Sambrook, D. Zurick, J. DeLoache, M. Bloom, S. Till Boysen, K. A. Bard, A. Learmonth, N. Newcombe
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  • Date Published: July 2014
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107646230

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About the Authors
  • How does knowledge of the body in space relate to an understanding of space itself? Spatial cognition is discussed from two closely related perspectives: the internal mapping of external stimuli (e.g., landmarks and sensory perception of environmental information) and the internal mapping of internally perceived stimuli (e.g., kinesthetic and visual imagery), and their subsequent effects on behaviour. Clarification of what spatial information is present in most perceptual processes and how this is used cognitively in relation to the self in space is then established. Major points and controversies of the various models are discussed, along with evolutionary perspectives of spatial perception and object recognition and comparisons between human and non-human spatial cognitive abilities and behaviours. Written for postgraduate students and researchers, the authors present theoretical and experimental accounts at multiple levels of analysis - perceptual, behavioural and cognitive - providing a thorough review of the mechanisms of spatial cognition.

    • Analyses all models of cognition and perception, presenting findings applicable to a variety of disciplines including biological anthropology, psychology and neuroscience
    • Primates, humans and other species are discussed, allowing comparison to increase understanding of the processes
    • With contributions from leading researchers in the field, providing an expert analysis of the cognitive and perceptual processes of spatial cognition
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "A strength of this work, though, is its interdisciplinary focus. It approaches the topics from multiple theoretical orientations and methodologies. These include philosophy, history, evolution, anthropology, comparative psychology, cognitive psychology, and neuroscience. Investigators from each of these fields will find something of interest here. Spatial Cognition, Spatial Perception is worth getting and is a must read for any researcher in either of these areas. Due to its breadth of coverage, it serves more as a reference guide than as a single-themed or specialty area book, but any topic can be looked up in the index and compared across chapters if necessary."
    Jay Friedenberg, PsycCRITIQUES

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2014
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107646230
    • length: 606 pages
    • dimensions: 230 x 154 x 35 mm
    • weight: 1.84kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction 1. Linking spatial cognition and spatial perception F. L. Dolins and R. W. Mitchell
    Part I. What Do Animals Know and How Do They Represent External Space?:
    2. Psychology and the philosophy of spatial perception: a history, or how the idea of spatial cognition in animals developed R. W. Mitchell and F. L. Dolins
    3. Common principles shared by spatial and other kinds of cognition K. Cheng
    4. To be buried in thought, lost in space or lost in action: is that the question? E. Menzel
    Part II. Perception and Memory of Landmarks: Implications for Spatial Behaviour and Cognition:
    5. The encoding of geometry in various vertebrate species C. Thinus-Blanc, V. Chabanne, L. Tommasi, P. Peruch and J. Vauclair
    6. The visually guided routes of ants T. Collett and P. Graham
    7. The role of landmarks in small and large scale navigation S. D. Healy and V. A. Braithwaite
    8. Examining spatial cognitive strategies in small-scale and large-scale space in tamarin monkeys P. A. Garber and F. L. Dolins
    9. Spatial learning and foraging in macaques C. Menzel
    Part III. Evolutionary Perspectives of Cognitive Capacities in Spatial Perception and Object Recognition:
    10. The evolution of human spatial cognition T. Wynn
    11. Egocentric and allocentric spatial learning in the nonhuman primate L. Rehbein, S. Schettler, R. Killiany and M. Moss
    12. Does the nature of cetacean perception make understanding object permanence unnecessary? R. W. Mitchell and E. Hoban
    13. Multimodal sensory integration and concurrent navigation strategies for spatial cognition in real and artificial organisms A. Arleo and L. Ronde-Reig
    Part IV. Does Mapping of the Body Generate Understanding of External Space?:
    14. Movement: the generative source of spatial perception and cognition M. Sheets-Johnstone
    15. Understanding the body: spatial perception and spatial cognition R. W. Mitchell
    16. The evolution of parietal areas involved in hand use in primates L. Krubitzer and E. Disbrow
    17. Body mapping and spatial transformations S. H. Creem-Regehr
    18. Understanding of external space generated by bodily re-mapping: an insight from the neurophysiology of tool-using monkeys A. Iriki
    19. Left-right spatial discrimination and the evolution of hemispheric specialization: some new thoughts on some old ideas W. D. Hopkins and C. Cantalupo
    Part V. Comparisons of Human and Non-Human Primate Spatial Cognitive Abilities:
    20. The geographical imagination R. Sambrook and D. Zurick
    21. Of chimps and children: use of spatial symbols by two species J. DeLoache and M. Bloom
    22. Chimpanzee spatial skills: a model for human performance on scale model tasks? S. Till Boysen and K. A. Bard
    23. The development of place learning in comparative perspective A. Learmonth and N. Newcombe
    24. Spatial cognition and memory in symbol-competent chimpanzees C. Menzel.

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  • Editors

    Francine L. Dolins, University of Michigan, Dearborn
    Francine L. Dolins is a Comparative Psychologist focusing on the spatial cognitive abilities of non-human and human primates in the field and laboratory, examining use of landmarks in large- and small-scale space and in simple and complex environments. Francine Dolins has related interests and publications in animal welfare, captive environmental enrichment, and conservation education, including an edited volume on societal attitudes to animals, and is currently guest editing a special issue of The American Journal of Primatology on conservation education. Her education was at the University's of Sussex and Stirling in the United Kingdom, and is currently employed at the University of Michigan.

    Robert W. Mitchell, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond
    Robert W. Mitchell has engaged in laboratory studies of cognition in primates, cetaceans, and canids, including human interactions with these animals, and is currently studying play and other social behavior in Galápagos sea lions. His graduate education was at the University of Hawai'i and Clark University, and he is currently Foundation Professor of Psychology at Eastern Kentucky University. He has edited books on various forms of animal and human cognition, including deception, pretense, self-awareness and anthropomorphism, and is on the boards of editors of the Journal of Comparative Psychology and Society and Animals.

    Contributors

    F. L. Dolins, R. W. Mitchell, K. Cheng, E. Menzel, C. Thinus-Blanc, V. Chabanne, L. Tommasi, P. Peruch, J. Vauclair, T. Collett, P. Graham, S. D. Healy, V. A. Braithwaite, P. A. Garber, C. Menzel, T. Wynn, L. Rehbein, S. Schettler, R. Killiany, M. Moss, E. Hoban, A. Arleo, L. Ronde-Reig, M. Sheets-Johnstone, L. Krubitzer, E. Disbrow, S. H. Creem-Regehr, A. Iriki, W. D. Hopkins, C. Cantalupo, R. Sambrook, D. Zurick, J. DeLoache, M. Bloom, S. Till Boysen, K. A. Bard, A. Learmonth, N. Newcombe

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