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The Cambridge Companion to Richard Wright

$24.00 ( ) USD

Part of Cambridge Companions to Literature

Glenda R. Carpio, George Hutchinson, Jay Garcia, Nathaniel F. Mills, Robert B. Stepto, Gene Andrew Jarrett, Kathryn S. Roberts, Tommie Shelby, Laurence Cossu-Beaumont, Alice Mikal Craven, Nicholas T. Rinehart, Stephan Kuhl, Ernest Julius Mitchell
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  • Date Published: March 2019
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108698108

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About the Authors
  • Hailed as 'the father of black literature in the twentieth century', Richard Wright was an iconoclast, an intellectual of towering stature, whose multidisciplinary erudition rivals only that of W. E. B. Du Bois. This collection captures Wright's immense power, which has made him a beacon for writers across decades, from the civil rights era to today. Individual essays examine Wright's art as central to his intellectual life and shed new light on his classic texts - Native Son and Black Boy. Other essays turn to his short fiction, and non-fiction as well as his lesser-known work in journalism and poetry, paying particular attention to manuscripts in Wright's archive - unpublished letters and novels, plans for multivolume works - that allow us to see the depth and expansiveness of his aesthetic and political vision. Exploring how Wright's expatriation to France facilitated a broadening of this vision, contributors challenge the idea that expatriation led to Wright's artistic decline.

    • Provides a broad account of Wright's oeuvre but also attends to topics, texts, and archival records that have not been previously discussed
    • Discusses Wright's seminal position in twentieth-century African American and Afro-diasporic literature
    • Offers accounts of Wright's artistic innovation and shows its connection to his political vision
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2019
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108698108
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: Richard Wright's art and politics Glenda R. Carpio
    Part I. Native Son in Jim Crow America:
    1. The literary ecology of Native Son and Black Boy George Hutchinson
    2. Richard Wright's planned incongruity: Black Boy as modern living Jay Garcia
    3. Marxism, communism, and Richard Wright's depression-era work Nathaniel F. Mills
    4. Rhythms of race in Richard Wright's 'Big Boy Leaves Home' Robert B. Stepto
    5. Sincere art and honest science: Richard Wright and the Chicago School of Sociology Gene Andrew Jarrett
    6. Outside joke: humorlessness and masculinity in Richard Wright Kathryn S. Roberts
    Part II. I Choose Exile: Wright Abroad:
    7. Freedom in a godless and unhappy world: Wright as outsider Tommie Shelby
    8. Richard Wright, Paris Noir, and transatlantic networks: a book history perspective Laurence Cossu-Beaumont
    9. Expatriation in Wright's late fiction Alice Mikal Craven
    10. Richard Wright's globalism Nicholas T. Rinehart
    11. Richard Wright's transnationalism and his unwritten Magnus Opus Stephan Kuhl
    12. Tenderness in early Richard Wright Ernest Julius Mitchell.

  • Editor

    Glenda R. Carpio, Harvard University, Massachusetts
    Glenda R. Carpio is Professor of African and African American Studies and English at Harvard University, Massachusetts. She is the author of Laughing Fit to Kill: Black Humor in the Fictions of Slavery (2008). She coedited African American Literary Studies: New Texts, New Approaches, New Challenges (2011) with Professor Werner Sollors and is currently at work on a book tentatively titled Migrant Aesthetics, a study of contemporary immigrant fiction.

    Contributors

    Glenda R. Carpio, George Hutchinson, Jay Garcia, Nathaniel F. Mills, Robert B. Stepto, Gene Andrew Jarrett, Kathryn S. Roberts, Tommie Shelby, Laurence Cossu-Beaumont, Alice Mikal Craven, Nicholas T. Rinehart, Stephan Kuhl, Ernest Julius Mitchell

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