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The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature

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John Morán González, Laura Lomas, Arturo Arias, Pedro García-Caro, Elisa Sampson Vera Tudela, Yolanda Martínez San Miguel, José Antonio Mazotti, María del Pilar Blanco, Carmen E. Lamas, Kirsten Silva Gruesz, Rodrigo Lazo, Jesse Alemán, Milagros López-Pelaez Casellas, Silvio Torres-Salliant, Antonio López, Yolanda Padilla, David Colón, César Salgado, Rafael Pérez-Torres, Urayoán Noel, William Luis, Ricardo Ortíz, Marta Caminero-Santangelo, Vanessa Pérez-Rosario, Ana Patricia Rodríguez, Crystal M. Kurzen, Norma Elia Cantú, Sophie Maríñez, Lorena Alvarado, Luz Angélica Kirschner, Laura G. Gutiérrez, William Orchard, Juanita Heredia, Claudia Milian, Richard Perez, Eliana Ávila, María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
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  • Date Published: February 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107183087

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About the Authors
  • The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature emphasizes the importance of understanding Latina/o literature not simply as a US ethnic phenomenon but more broadly as an important element of a trans-American literary imagination. Engaging with the dynamics of migration, linguistic and cultural translation, and the uneven distribution of resources across the Americas that characterize Latina/o literature, the essays in this History provide a critical overview of key texts, authors, themes, and contexts as discussed by leading scholars in the field. This book demonstrates the relevance of Latina/o literature for a world defined by the migration of people, commodities, and cultural expressions.

    • Redefines the contours of Latina/o American literature, updating the definition of 'Latina/o' to address the diaspora of the Latin American and Caribbean region previously occupied by Spain and Portugal's empires, including Haiti and Brazil
    • Moves beyond competing reference texts to include in-depth critical examination of key figures, genres and historical periods at the forefront of scholarly conversations, appealing to scholars working outside of Latina/o literary studies on historical periods
    • Moves from traditional literary genres to performance, sound and electronic forms, pushing literary scholars of literature to consider the limits and future of literature beyond the traditional genres and formats
    Read more

    Awards

    • Winner, 2018 Choice Outstanding Academic Title

    Reviews & endorsements

    'This edited collection extends the discussion of Latin literature beyond the borders of the Americas. … This book is an absolute necessity for students of Latin American literature. Essential.' K. Gale, Choice

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107183087
    • length: 854 pages
    • dimensions: 236 x 158 x 49 mm
    • weight: 1.27kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    List of contributors
    Acknowledgements: Introduction
    Part I. Rereading the Colonial Archive: Transculturation and Conflict, 1492–1810:
    1. Indigenous Herencias: Creoles, mestizaje, and nations before nationalism
    2. Performing to a captive audience: dramatic encounters in the borderlands of empire
    3. The tricks of the weak: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and the feminist temporality of Latina literature
    4. Rethinking the colonial Latinx literary imaginary: a comparative and decolonial research agenda
    5. The historical and imagined cultural geographies of Latinidad
    Part II. The Roots and Routes of Latina/o Literature: The Literary Emergence of a Trans-American Imaginary, 1783–1912:
    6. Whither Latinidad?: the trajectories of Latin American, Caribbean, and Latina/o literature
    7. Father Félix Varela and the emergence of an organized Latina/o minority in early nineteenth-century New York City
    8. Transamerican New Orleans: Latino literature of the Gulf of Mexico, from the Spanish colonial period to post-Katrina
    9. Trajectories of exchange: toward histories of Latino literature
    10. Narratives of displacement in places that once were Mexican
    11. Latina feminism, Latina racism and unspeakable violence: travel narratives, novels of reform, and histories of genocide and lynching
    12. José Martí, comparative reading, and the emergence of Latino modernity in gilded-age New York
    13. Afro-Latinidad: phoenix rising from a hemisphere's racist flames
    Part III. Negotiating Literary Modernity: Between Colonial Subjectivity and National Citizenship, 1910–79:
    14. Oratory, memoir, and theater: performances of race and class in the early twentieth-century Latina/o public sphere
    15. Literary revolutions in the borderlands: transnational dimensions of the Mexican Revolution and its diaspora in the United States
    16. Making it nuevo: Latina/o modernist poetics remake high Euro-American modernism
    17. The archive and Afro-Latina/o field-formation: Arturo Alfonso Schomburg at the intersection of Puerto Rican and African American literatures
    18. Floricanto en Aztlán: Chicano cultural nationalism and its epic discontents
    19. 'The geography of their complexion': Nuyorican poetry and its legacies
    20. Cuban American counterpoint: the heterogeneity of Cuban American literature, culture, and politics
    21. Latina/o theater and performance in the contexts of social movements
    Part IV. Literary Migrations across the Americas, 1980–2017:
    22. Undocumented immigration in Latina/o literature
    23. Latina feminist theory and writing
    24. Invisible no more: US central American literature before and beyond the age of neoliberalism
    25. Latina/o life narratives: crafting self-referential forms in the colonial milieu of the Americas
    26. Poetics of the 'majority minority'
    27. The Quisqueya diaspora: the emergence of Latina/o literature from Hispaniola
    28. Listening to literature: popular music, voice, and dance in the Latina/o literary imagination, 1980–2010
    29. Brazuca literature: old and new currents, countercurrents, and undercurrents
    30. Staging Latinidad and interrogating neoliberalism in contemporary Latina/o performance and border art
    31. Transamerican popular forms of Latina/o literature: genre fiction, graphic novels, and digital environments
    32. trauma, translation, and migration in the crossfire of the Americas: the intersection of Latina/o and South American literatures
    33. The Mesoamerican corridor, central American transits, and Latina/o becomings
    34. Differential visions: the diasporic stranger, subalternity, and the transing of experience in US Puerto Rican literature
    35. Temporal borderlands: toward decolonial queer temporality in Latina/o literature
    Epilogue: Latina/o literature: the borders are burning
    Chronology
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Editors

    John Morán González, University of Texas, Austin
    John Morán González (Ph.D. Stanford University, 1998) is Professor of English and Director of the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. He is author of Border Renaissance: The Texas Centennial and the Emergence of Mexican American Literature (2009) and The Troubled Union: Expansionist Imperatives in Post-Reconstruction American Novels (2010). His articles and reviews have appeared in American Literature, American Literary History, Aztlán, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, Symbolism, Western Historical Quarterly and Western American Literature. He edited The Cambridge Companion to Latina/o American Literature (2016).

    Laura Lomas, Rutgers University, New Jersey
    Llaura Lomas (Ph.D. Columbia University, 2001) is Associate Professor in the English Department at Rutgers University-Newark, where she teaches Latina/o and comparative American literature. Her first book Translating Empire: José Martí, Migrant Latino Subjects and American Modernities (2008), won the Modern Language Association (MLA) Prize for Latina/o and Chicana/o literature and an honourable mention from the Latin American Studies Association's Latina/o Studies Section. She is currently writing a monograph on Lourdes Casal and interdisciplinarity and preparing an anthologies of Casal's collected writings. Lomas has published essays and book chapters most recently in Small Axe, The Latino Nineteenth Century, Translation Review, Cuban Studies, and American Literature.

    Contributors

    John Morán González, Laura Lomas, Arturo Arias, Pedro García-Caro, Elisa Sampson Vera Tudela, Yolanda Martínez San Miguel, José Antonio Mazotti, María del Pilar Blanco, Carmen E. Lamas, Kirsten Silva Gruesz, Rodrigo Lazo, Jesse Alemán, Milagros López-Pelaez Casellas, Silvio Torres-Salliant, Antonio López, Yolanda Padilla, David Colón, César Salgado, Rafael Pérez-Torres, Urayoán Noel, William Luis, Ricardo Ortíz, Marta Caminero-Santangelo, Vanessa Pérez-Rosario, Ana Patricia Rodríguez, Crystal M. Kurzen, Norma Elia Cantú, Sophie Maríñez, Lorena Alvarado, Luz Angélica Kirschner, Laura G. Gutiérrez, William Orchard, Juanita Heredia, Claudia Milian, Richard Perez, Eliana Ávila, María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo

    Awards

    • Winner, 2018 Choice Outstanding Academic Title

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