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The Literature of Labor and the Labors of Literature
Allegory in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction

$33.00 ( ) USD

Part of Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture

  • Date Published: April 2011
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511886164

$ 33.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • This book juxtaposes representations of labor in fictional texts with representations of labor in nonfictional texts in order to trace the intersections between aesthetic and economic discourse in nineteenth-century America. This intersection is particularly evident in the debates about symbol and allegory, and Cindy Weinstein contends that allegory during this period was critiqued on precisely the same grounds as mechanized labor. In the course of completing a historical investigation, Weinstein revolutionizes the notion of allegorical narrative, which is exposed as a literary medium of greater depth and consequence than has previously been implied.

    • Throws new light on neglected texts by Hawthorne, Melville and Twain
    • Identifies significant links between aesthetic and economic discourse
    • Shows how various literary styles - including symbol and allegory - are used to illuminate the discourse of labour
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "More than any critic I can think of, Cindy Weinstein has developed a sustained argument about the historical conditions for allegory....this bold new theory of allegory puts Cindy Weinstein at the forefront of a new generation of Americanists." Wai-Chee Dimock, Brandeis University

    "...Weinstein's book attends carefully to authors' contradictory uses of allegory. Always situating texts in a historical and cultural framework, Weinstein illuminates interestingly Ahab's simultaneous foregrounding and erasure of his labor in meaning-making and Mark Twain's attraction to two conflicting models of personhood (statistical and nonstatistical) in Connecticut Yankee." Nineteenth-Century Literature

    "The soundness of Weinstein's thesis and the theoretical sophistication of her individual readings make this an important book..." American Literature

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2011
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511886164
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Acknowledgements
    Introduction
    1. The problem with labor and the promise of leisure
    2. Hawthorne and the economics of allegory
    3. Melville's operatives
    4. Twain in the man-factory
    5. The manikin, the machine, and the Virgin Mary
    Afterword
    Notes
    Index.

  • Author

    Cindy Weinstein, California Institute of Technology

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