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The Romantic Tavern

The Romantic Tavern
Literature and Conviviality in the Age of Revolution

$99.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Romanticism

  • Author: Ian Newman, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
  • Publication planned for: May 2019
  • availability: Not yet published - available from May 2019
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108470377

$ 99.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • The tavern is widely acknowledged as central to the cultural and political life of Britain, yet widely misunderstood. Ian Newman provides the first sustained account of one of the primary institutions of the late eighteenth-century public sphere. The tavern was a venue not only for serious political and literary debate, but also for physical pleasure - the ludic, libidinal and gastronomic enjoyments with which late Georgian public life was inextricably entwined. This study focuses on the architecture of taverns and the people who frequented them, as well as the artistic forms - drinking songs, ballads, Anacreontic poetry, and toasting - with which the tavern was associated. By examining the culture of conviviality that emerged alongside other new forms of sociability in the second half of the eighteenth century, The Romantic Tavern argues for the importance of conviviality as a complex new form of sociability shaped by masculine political gathering and mixed company entertainments.

    • Delivers a comprehensive study of one of the primary institutions of the late eighteenth-century public sphere, the tavern
    • Combines exploration of architecture and culture to show how cultural production interacted with the built environment
    • Focuses on the relevance of taverns to works of canonical literature
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: May 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108470377
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 mm
    • contains: 22 b/w illus. 3 maps
    • availability: Not yet published - available from May 2019
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Tavern Space:
    1. Introduction
    2. London tavern: Edmund Burke, the East India Company and literary men
    3. Crown and anchor dreams: sedition in the Strand
    Part II. Tavern Genres:
    4. Political ballads: Captain Morris and the convivial Whigs
    5. Anacreontic odes: drink poetry and the politics of pleasure
    6. Bawdy and lyrical ballads: Wordsworth and the ballad debates of the 1790s
    7. Toasting: political speech, convivial art
    8. Epilogue
    Notes
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Ian Newman, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
    Ian Newman is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and a fellow of the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, where he specializes in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British and Irish literature. He has co-edited Charles Dibdin and Late Georgian Culture (2018) with Oskar Cox Jensen and David Kennerley, and his work has appeared in Studies in English Literature, European Romantic Review, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Studies in Romanticism.

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