Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist
Ulysses, Film and Visual Culture

Ulysses, Film and Visual Culture

$105.00 (C)

  • Date Published: November 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108428408

$ 105.00 (C)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Although Joyce was losing his sight when he wrote Ulysses, Stephen's and Bloom's visual experiences are extraordinarily rich and complex. Absorbing the influences of popular visual attractions such as dioramas, stereoscopes and mutoscopes, their perceptions of Dublin are shaped by what Walter Benjamin calls 'unconscious optics'. Analyzing closely the texture of their impressions and of Joyce's prismatic narrative styles, Philip Sicker explores the phenomenon of sight from a wide-ranging set of perspectives: eighteenth-century epistemology (Locke and Berkeley), theories of the flaneur (Baudelaire and Benjamin), Italian Futurist art (Marinetti and Boccioni), photography (Barthes and Sontag), and the silent films Joyce watched in Dublin and Trieste. The concept of 'spectacle' as a mechanically-constructed visual experience informs Sicker's examination of mediated perception and emerges as a hallmark of modernist culture itself. This study is an important contribution to the growing interest in how deeply the philosophy and science of visual perception influenced modernism.

    • Presents a new reading of Ulysses through visual culture
    • Traces the influence of specific films that Joyce saw and drew upon
    • Analyzes modern urban experience through Joyce's version of the flaneur
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'Sicker’s book … brings Ulysses alive by examining its particularities and specificities. … His book demonstrates that there is still much fertile and enriching ground to be tilled and planted in our examination of one of the central books of Western literature.' Peter O’Brien, The Fortnightly Review

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108428408
    • length: 276 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 157 x 19 mm
    • weight: 0.54kg
    • contains: 7 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: Joyce's spectacles: technologies of sight
    1. Ineluctable visuality: Stephen's ways of seeing
    2. 'Caught in this burning scene': Stephen in the gaze of others
    3. Snapshots from the pavement: Bloom as modernist flaneur
    4. Painting motion: 'wandering rocks' as futurist narrative
    5. 'Alone in the hiding twilight': Bloom's cinematic gaze in 'Nausicaa'
    6. Mirages in the lampglow: 'circle' and Melies's dream cinema
    7. Vision conjoined: Stephen and Bloom's intersubjective perception.

  • Author

    Philip Sicker, Fordham University, New York
    Philip Sicker is Professor of English at Fordham University, New York, and co-editor of Joyce Studies Annual. He has published widely on James Joyce, Henry James, D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Mann, Vladimir Nabokov, narrative theory and film.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×