Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

The Best Are Leaving
Emigration and Post-War Irish Culture

$80.99 (C)

  • Date Published: February 2015
  • availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107048409

$ 80.99 (C)
Hardback

Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
Notify me when available Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Clair Wills's The Best Are Leaving is an important and wide-ranging study of post-war Irish emigrant culture. Wills analyses representations of emigrants from Ireland and of Irish immigrants in Britain across a range of discourses, including official documents, sociological texts, clerical literature, journalism, drama, literary fiction, and popular literature and film. This book, written by a leading critic of Irish literature and culture, examines public opinion about post-war emigration from Ireland and about the immigrant community in Britain by discussing topics such as the loss of the finest people from rural Ireland and the destruction of traditional communities; the anxieties of women emigrants and their desire for the benefits of modern consumer society; the stereotype of the drunken Irishman; the charming and authentic country Irish in the city; and the ambiguous meanings of Irish Catholicism in England, which was viewed as both a threatening and civilising force. Wills explores this theme of emigration through writers as diverse as M. J. Molloy, John B. Keane, Tom Murphy, and Edna O'Brien.

    • Presents the most up-to-date scholarship in the field
    • Explores the theme of emigration through a diverse range of authors and artists
    • Applies an interdisciplinary approach to the subject of Irish emigration
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "Sharp and illuminating … [Wills'] study is deeply impressive in the scope of its learning and the range of its sympathies."
    Sunday Business Post

    "A fine study of an absorbing subject."
    Irish Mail on Sunday

    '… Wills has written a thoughtful, open-minded and lucid book that shows that the 'great silence' which enveloped commentary on the Irish language in independent Ireland often characterized the emigrant experience too. One of the most moving and beautiful aspects of this compelling narrative is Wills’s account of her own mother and of her attempts to negotiate for her family between two exacting cultures. She succeeded magnificently - and one outcome is this valuable and necessary book.' Breac

    '[This] book … brings to the forefront an often overlooked era in twentieth-century Irish culture … [the author shows us] that this period of departure and radical social change deserves the same rigorous engagement that so frequently attends to global political concerns and earlier twentieth-century periods in Ireland … Wills’ focus brings insight and originality born from top-notch research throughout the book.' Maria McGarrity, Irish Literary Supplement

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2015
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107048409
    • length: 218 pages
    • dimensions: 237 x 159 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.46kg
    • contains: 8 b/w illus.
    • availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
  • Table of Contents

    1. The best are leaving: fitness, marriage, and the crisis of the national family
    2. Pink witch: women, modernity, and urbanisation
    3. British paddies: realism and the Irish immigrant
    4. The vanishing Irish: assimilation, ethnicisation, and literary caricature
    5. Clay is the flesh: looking at manual labour.

  • Author

    Clair Wills, Queen Mary University of London
    Clair Wills is Professor of Irish Literature at Queen Mary, University of London. Previous publications include That Neutral Island: A History of Ireland during the Second World War (2007) and Dublin 1916: The Siege of the GPO (2009).

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×