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Affect and Literature

Affect and Literature

$120.00 (R)

Part of Cambridge Critical Concepts

Alex Houen, Dana LaCourse Munteanu, Stefan Uhlig, John Protevi, Helen Thaventhiran, Ross Wilson, Jean-Michel Rabaté, Geoff Gilbert, Anthony Uhlmann, Sneja Gunew, Alison Denham, Benedict S. Robinson, Matthew Bevis, Derek Attridge, Christopher Nealon, Amber Musser, Ankhi Mukherjee, Stephen Morton, Margaret Ronda, Emily Horton, Amira Jarmakani, Andrew Murphie, Eric Jenkins, Claire Colebrook
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  • Publication planned for: April 2020
  • availability: Not yet published - available from April 2020
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108424516

$ 120.00 (R)
Hardback

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About the Authors
  • This book considers how 'affect', the experience of feeling or emotion, has developed as a critical concept within literary studies in different periods and through a range of approaches. Stretching from the classical to the contemporary, the first section of the book, 'Origins', considers the importance of particular areas of philosophy, theory, and criticism that have been important for conceptualizing affect and its relation to literature. Includes ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, eighteenth-century aesthetics, Marxist theory, psychoanalysis, queer theory, and postcolonial theory. The chapters of the second section, 'Developments', correspond to those of the previous section and build on their insights through readings of particular texts. The final 'Applications' section is focused on contemporary and future lines of enquiry, and revolves around a particular set of concerns: media and communications, capitalism, and an environment of affective relations that extend to ecology, social crisis, and war.

    • Presents cutting-edge research on concepts of affect in terms of a range of literary genres: fiction, poetry, drama
    • Explores a large range of positive, negative, and aesthetic affects
    • Considers different interdisciplinary approaches to affect theory
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: April 2020
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108424516
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 mm
    • availability: Not yet published - available from April 2020
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: affect and literature Alex Houen
    Part I. Origins:
    1. Poetic fear-related affects and society in Greco-Roman antiquity Dana LaCourse Munteanu
    2. Secondary affect in Lessing, Mendelssohn, and Nicolai Stefan Uhlig
    3. Affect and life in Spinoza, Nietzsche, and Bergson John Protevi
    4. Feelings under the microscope: new critical affect Helen Thaventhiran
    5. 'We manufacture fun: capital and the production of affect Ross Wilson
    6. Jacques Lacan's evanescent affects Jean-Michel Rabaté
    7. The durability of affect and the ageing of gay male queer theory Geoff Gilbert
    8. Affect, meaning, becoming, and power: Massumi, Spinoza, Deleuze, and neuroscience Anthony Uhlmann
    9. Translating postcolonial affect Sneja Gunew
    10. Making sorrow sweet: emotion and empathy in the experience of fiction Alison Denham
    Part II. Developments:
    11. Feeling feelings in early modern England Benedict S. Robinson
    12. Laughable poetry Matthew Bevis
    13. Modernism, formal innovation, and affect in some contemporary Irish novels Derek Attridge
    14. The antihumanist tone Christopher Nealon
    15. Bette Davis's eyes and minoritarian survival: camp, melodrama, and spectatorship Amber Musser
    16. Affective form Ankhi Mukherjee
    17. Subaltern affects Stephen Morton
    Part III. Applications:
    18. Affect and environment in contemporary ecopoetics Margaret Ronda
    19. Contemporary crisis fictions: twenty-first century disaffection Emily Horton
    20. Shiny happy imperialism: an affective exploration of 'ways of life' in the war on terror Amira Jarmakani
    21. The digital's amodal affect Andrew Murphie
    22. Digital special affects: on exhilaration and the STUN in CGI blockbuster films Eric Jenkins
    23. Cartesian affect Claire Colebrook.

  • Editor

    Alex Houen, University of Cambridge
    Alex Houen is author of Terrorism and Modern Literature (2002), and Powers of Possibility: Experimental American Writing since the 1960s (2012). His edited publications include: a special issue on 'Affects, Text, and Performativity' of Textual Practice (March/April 2011); and (with Jan-Melissa Schramm), Sacrifice and Modern War Literature: Battle of Waterloo to the War on Terror (2018). He also co-edits the international journal of poetry, Blackbox Manifold.

    Contributors

    Alex Houen, Dana LaCourse Munteanu, Stefan Uhlig, John Protevi, Helen Thaventhiran, Ross Wilson, Jean-Michel Rabaté, Geoff Gilbert, Anthony Uhlmann, Sneja Gunew, Alison Denham, Benedict S. Robinson, Matthew Bevis, Derek Attridge, Christopher Nealon, Amber Musser, Ankhi Mukherjee, Stephen Morton, Margaret Ronda, Emily Horton, Amira Jarmakani, Andrew Murphie, Eric Jenkins, Claire Colebrook

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