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The Renaissance Reform of the Book and Britain
The English Quattrocento

$80.00 ( ) USD

Part of Cambridge Studies in Palaeography and Codicology

  • Date Published: May 2019
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108148993

$ 80.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • What has fifteenth-century England to do with the Renaissance? By challenging accepted notions of 'medieval' and 'early modern' David Rundle proposes a new understanding of English engagement with the Renaissance. He does so by focussing on one central element of the humanist agenda - the reform of the script and of the book more generally - to demonstrate a tradition of engagement from the 1430s into the early sixteenth century. Introducing a cast-list of scribes and collectors who are not only English and Italian but also Scottish, Dutch and German, this study sheds light on the cosmopolitanism central to the success of the humanist agenda. Questioning accepted narratives of the slow spread of the Renaissance from Italy to other parts of Europe, Rundle suggests new possibilities for the fields of manuscript studies and the study of Renaissance humanism.

    • The book is supported with extensive illustrations and a colour plate section
    • Proposes a new understanding of English engagement with the Renaissance by focusing on a central element of humanist agenda, the reform of the manuscript
    • Explores a pan-European collection of manuscripts including texts from Italy, Germany, the Netherlands and Scotland
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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2019
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108148993
    • contains: 24 b/w illus. 16 colour illus.
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: the revival of letters and the uses of palaeography
    1. The eloquent page: humanism and script, humanism and England
    2. Humanist script in England: the first ten years
    3. British barbarians in Italy and Scotland's first humanist
    4. The Dutch connexion: the significance of low countries scribes from Theoderic Werken to Pieter Meghen
    5. The Butcher of England and the learning of Italy: John Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester and the 'pupils of Guarino'
    6. The victory of italic in diplomatic correspondence
    7. Conclusion: beyond humanism, beyond words.

  • Author

    David Rundle, University of Kent, Canterbury
    David Rundle is Lecturer in Latin and Manuscript Studies at the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Kent. His previous publications include, as co-author with Ralph Hanna, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Western Manuscripts, up to c. 1600, in Christ Church, Oxford (2017).

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