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Thinking about Bribery
Neuroscience, Moral Cognition and the Psychology of Bribery

$34.00 ( ) USD

Diana C. Robertson, Philip M. Nichols, Trishala Parthasarathi, Joseph W. Kable, Melanie Pincus, Lisa LaViers, Michael J. Prietula, Gregory Berns, James Dungan, Adam Waytz, Liane Young, Andrew Samuel, Xiao-Xiao Liu, George I. Christopoulos, Ying-yi Hong, Sunita Sah, George Loewenstein, Cristina Bicchieri, Deshani Ganegoda, Robert A. Prentice
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  • Date Published: September 2017
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108515269

$ 34.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • Bribery is perhaps the most visible and most frequently studied form of corruption. Very little research, however, examines the individual decision to offer or accept a bribe, or how understanding that decision can help to effectively control bribery. This book brings together research by scholars from a variety of disciplines studying the mind and morality, who use their research to explain how and why decisions regarding participation in bribery are made. It first examines bribery from the perspective of brain structure, then approaches the decision to engage in bribery from a cognitive perspective. It examines the psychological costs imposed on a person who engages in bribery, and studies societal and organizational norms and their impact on bribery. This is an ideal read for scholars and other interested persons studying business ethics, bribery and corruption, corruption control, and the applications of neuroscience in a business environment.

    • Examines bribery from the new perspective of cognitive neuroscience, and will therefore appeal to scholars wanting to learn how cognitive neuroscience can inform their research
    • Offers a multi-disciplinary perspective, drawing on behavioral economics, law, and organizational behaviour, as well as neuroscience and psychology, thus having wide appeal to those studying bribery in a variety of fields
    • Builds on the neuroscience of morality, applying moral decision-making to explore the individual decision of bribery, and offering an effective contribution to programs attempting to control bribery
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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108515269
    • contains: 13 b/w illus. 6 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction and overview: bribery and the study of decision making Diana C. Robertson and Philip M. Nichols
    Part I. Structure and Mechanics of the Brain:
    2. Cognitive neuroscience methods: an introductory overview for social scientists Trishala Parthasarathi and Joseph W. Kable
    3. The conforming brain and deontological resolve Melanie Pincus, Lisa LaViers, Michael J. Prietula and Gregory Berns
    Part II. Moral Cognition and Bribery:
    4. Corruption in the context of moral trade-offs James Dungan, Adam Waytz and Liane Young
    5. Cognitive dissonance, ethical behavior, and bribery Andrew Samuel
    Part III. Psychological Insights into Bribery:
    6. Beyond black and white: three decision frames of bribery Xiao-Xiao Liu, George I. Christopoulos and Ying-yi Hong
    7. Effect of reminders of personal sacrifice and suggested rationalizations on residents' self-reported willingness to accept gifts Sunita Sah and George Loewenstein
    Part IV. Norms and the Decision to Engage in Bribery:
    8. Determinants of corruption: a socio-psychological analysis Cristina Bicchieri and Deshani Ganegoda
    9. Moral norms, behavioral ethics, and bribery activity Robert A. Prentice
    10. Thoughts on the control of bribery Philip M. Nichols and Diana C. Robertson.

  • Editors

    Philip M. Nichols, University of Pennsylvania
    Philip Nichols is the Joseph Kolodny Professor of Social Responsibility in Business and Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He also currently serves as the Co-Chair of the Anti-Corruption Law Interest Group of the American Society of International Law, and as the President of the Academy of Legal Studies in Business.

    Diana C. Robertson, University of Pennsylvania
    Diana C. Robertson is James T. Riady Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Her research centres on business ethics and corporate social responsibility, and she has published numerous works in management science and business ethics.

    Contributors

    Diana C. Robertson, Philip M. Nichols, Trishala Parthasarathi, Joseph W. Kable, Melanie Pincus, Lisa LaViers, Michael J. Prietula, Gregory Berns, James Dungan, Adam Waytz, Liane Young, Andrew Samuel, Xiao-Xiao Liu, George I. Christopoulos, Ying-yi Hong, Sunita Sah, George Loewenstein, Cristina Bicchieri, Deshani Ganegoda, Robert A. Prentice

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