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Case Studies in Epilepsy
Common and Uncommon Presentations

$65.99 (G)

Part of Case Studies in Neurology

Christophe Rauch, Hermann Stefan, Francesco Mari, Renzo Guerrini, Frank Kerling, Adam Strzelczyk, Sebastian Bauer, Felix Rosenow, Francesco Zellini, Alessio De Ciantis, Barbara Fiedler, Gerhard Kurlemann, Katrin Hüttemann, Melania Falchi, Guido Rubboli, Stefano Meletti, Marco Giulioni, Anna Federica Mariani, Yerma Bartolini, Stefano Forlivesi, Elena Gardella, Roberto Michelucci, Björn Holnberg, Elinor Ben-Menachem, Thilo Hammen, Christian Tilz, Patrick Chauvel, Friedhelm Schmitt, Barbara Schmalbach, Nicolas Lang, Burkhard Kasper, Elisabeth Pauli, Wolfgang Graf, Marcel Heers, Stefan Rampp, Carmen Barba, Tobias Knieß, Xintong Wu, Jörg Wellmer, Mathieu Sprengers, Paul Boon, Kristl Vonck
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  • Date Published: January 2013
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521167123

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  • Clinical case studies have long been recognized as a useful adjunct to problem-based learning and continuing professional development. They emphasize the need for clinical reasoning, integrative thinking, problem-solving, communication, teamwork and self-directed learning – all desirable generic skills for health care professionals. Epilepsy is amongst the most frequently encountered of neurological disorders. There are important emerging clinical management issues (e.g., first seizure, therapy-resistant seizures, ICU, pregnancy) but also differential diagnosis of non-epileptic seizures (syncopy, pseudo-seizure, paroxysmal dystonic syndromes, sleep disorders, psychosis, inborn errors of metabolism, etc.). This selection of epilepsy case studies will inform and challenge clinicians at all stages in their careers. Including both common and uncommon cases, Case Studies in Epilepsy reinforces the diagnostic skills and treatment decision-making processes necessary to treat epilepsy and other seizures confidently. Written by leading experts, the cases and discussions work through differential diagnoses, treatments and social consequences in pediatric and adult patients.

    • Includes recommended treatment plans which aid quick and accurate treatment of patients
    • Case studies enable learning from real experiences
    • Collects experiences from different European countries
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '… the book is very entertaining … some particular clinical 'pearls' are scattered among the patients' histories, enriching the value of this work.' European Neurology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2013
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521167123
    • length: 214 pages
    • dimensions: 246 x 189 x 11 mm
    • weight: 0.42kg
    • contains: 118 b/w illus. 16 colour illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Part I. Diagnosis:
    1. First seizure: is it epilepsy?
    2. Intractable epilepsy and epilepsia partialis continua associated with respiratory chain deficiency
    3. Reasons for violent behaviour - when a man strangles his wife
    4. Repetitive monocular eye adduction
    5. Febrile infectious-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES)
    6. Epileptic seizures as presenting symptom of the Shaken Baby Syndrome
    7. Benign rolandic epilepsy
    8. New onset focal and generalized epilepsy in an elderly patient
    9. When laughing makes the child fall down
    10. Epileptic spasms and abnormal neuronal migration
    11. A feeling of gooseflesh
    12. Generalized epilepsy in adolescence as initial manifestation of Lafora disease
    13. Epilepsy with a right temporal hyperintense lesion in MRI
    14. Epileptic falling seizures associated with seizure-induced cardiac asystole in drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy
    15. Seizures, dementia and stroke?
    16. Comorbidity in epilepsy - dual pathology resulting in simple focal, complex focal and tonic clonic seizures
    17. Minor motor events
    18. Epilepsy in the ring chromosome 20
    19. A late diagnosis of medial temporal lobe epilepsy
    20. Experimental phenomena in temporal lobe epilepsy
    21. The use of depth EEG (SEEG) recordings in a case of frontal lobe epilepsy
    22. A frontal lobe epilepsy surgery based on totally non-invasive investigations
    23. A young man with reading-induced seizure
    24. The lady from 'no-man's-land'
    25. The man who came (too) late
    26. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis
    27. Really a cerebrovascular story?
    28. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy - the ultimate failure
    29. Blind but able to see
    30. Seizure disorder! Really unexpected?
    31. Transient epileptic amnesia in late onset epilepsy
    32. A really unexpected injury?
    33. Epileptic negative myoclonus in benign rolandic epilepsy
    34. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine
    35. A strange symptom: psychotic or ictal?
    36. Hearing voices: focal epilepsy guides diagnosis of genetic disease
    37. Life threatening status epilepticus due to focal cortical dysplasia
    38. Childhood occipital idiopathic epilepsy
    Part II. Treatment:
    39. Unconscious: never again work above a meter?
    40. A patient's patience
    41. Idiopathic absence epilepsy: unusual AED consumption successful
    42. Woman with gastric reflux - careful with combinations of medications
    43. An example of both pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions
    44. Never give up trying to find the right medication even in patients who are refractory
    45. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and seizure aggravation
    46. Episodic aphasia - surgery or not?
    47. Temporal lobe epilepsy: drugs or surgery?
    48. Shaking in elderly: reversible or fate?
    49. Failure of surgical treatment in a typical medial temporal lobe epilepsy
    50. Cutaneous adverse reactions by AEDs: chance or predetermination?
    51. Timing of medical and surgical treatment of epilepsy: a hemispherotomy that would have prevented disabling cerebellar atrophy
    52. Anticonvulsive drugs for gate disturbance and slurred speech?
    53. Unsuccessful surgery: another chance?
    54. If it's not broken, don't fix it!
    55. Never ever give up
    56. Hippocampal deep brain stimulation may be an alternative for resective surgery in medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy
    57. Myoclonic seizures and recurrent nonconvulsive status epilepticus in Dravet syndrome
    58. Functional hemispherotomy for drug-resistant post-traumatic epilepsy
    59. Pharmo-resistent epilepsy?
    60. Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy
    61. The strange behaviour of a vegetarian: a diagnostic indicator for treatment?
    Index.

  • Editors

    Hermann Stefan, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
    Hermann Stefan, MD PhD, is Professor of Neurology and Epileptology at the University of Erlangen, Neurological Department.

    Elinor Ben-Menachem, Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden
    Professor Patrick Y. Chauvel is Chairman, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, la Timone Hospital, Professor of Physiology, Faculté de Médecine of the Université de la Méditerranée and Director of the Laboratoire de Neurophysiologie and Neuropsychologie (INSERM-Université), Marseille, France.

    Patrick Chauvel, Université de la Méditerranée, Aix Marseille II
    Elinor Ben-Menachem, MD PhD, Professor in Neurology, Chief Editor Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, Institute for Clinical Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

    Renzo Guerrini, Children's Hospital A. Meyer-University of Florence
    Renzo Guerrini, MD, Professor of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Director – Pediatric Neurology Unit and Laboratories, Children's Hospital A. Meyer-University of Florence, Firenze, Italy.

    Contributors

    Christophe Rauch, Hermann Stefan, Francesco Mari, Renzo Guerrini, Frank Kerling, Adam Strzelczyk, Sebastian Bauer, Felix Rosenow, Francesco Zellini, Alessio De Ciantis, Barbara Fiedler, Gerhard Kurlemann, Katrin Hüttemann, Melania Falchi, Guido Rubboli, Stefano Meletti, Marco Giulioni, Anna Federica Mariani, Yerma Bartolini, Stefano Forlivesi, Elena Gardella, Roberto Michelucci, Björn Holnberg, Elinor Ben-Menachem, Thilo Hammen, Christian Tilz, Patrick Chauvel, Friedhelm Schmitt, Barbara Schmalbach, Nicolas Lang, Burkhard Kasper, Elisabeth Pauli, Wolfgang Graf, Marcel Heers, Stefan Rampp, Carmen Barba, Tobias Knieß, Xintong Wu, Jörg Wellmer, Mathieu Sprengers, Paul Boon, Kristl Vonck

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