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Look Inside The Modern Invention of Medieval Music

The Modern Invention of Medieval Music
Scholarship, Ideology, Performance

$89.99 (C)

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Part of Musical Performance and Reception

  • Date Published: July 2007
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521037044

$ 89.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Scholars and performers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries attempted to revive music that could evoke the Middle Ages. They invented new sounds and new ways of understanding medieval music. This is the fascinating story of the musicians and the societies in which they worked to remake a lost musical world.

    • Controversial - questions some of musicology's most cherished beliefs
    • Discusses well-known performers and recordings of early music (David Munrow, Gothic Voices, etc.)
    • Very readable - enlivened by the author's memories of many of the people and trends he discusses
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    Awards

    • Winner of the Royal Philharmonic Society Book Award for 2003

    Reviews & endorsements

    "This book is a good read for anyone who is interested in medieval music or has an interest in how history, particularly music history, is written and developed." Music Educators Journal

    "Part histoiography and part reception history, this meticulously researched volume reminds readers that no attempt to re-create the music of the past is likely to avoid doing sos through perspectives that are decidedly embedded in the present. Highly recommended." Choice

    "The Modern Invention of Medieval Music is n important book. It raises fundamental questions about the relation among music, performance, and historical writing. It belongs on the reading lists of every graduate course in musicological methods, and by extension in the hands of any musicologist interested in how and (more importantly) why we write about music. I cannot praise this book enough for its imagination, daring and élan. It is a book that hits us where we live." Current Musicology, Thomas Irvine

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2007
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521037044
    • length: 348 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 154 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.528kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus. 5 music examples
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Acknowledgements
    Introduction
    1. The invention of the voices-and-instruments hypothesis
    2. The re-invention of the a cappella hypothesis
    3. Hearing medieval harmonies
    4. Evidence, interpretation, power and persuasion
    Conclusion
    Notes
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Daniel Leech-Wilkinson, King's College London
    Daniel Leech-Wilkinson is a writer and broadcaster on medieval music. He is Reader in Historical Musicology at King's College, London and his previous books include studies and editions of the fourteenth-century poet and composer Guillaume de Machaut.

    Awards

    • Winner of the Royal Philharmonic Society Book Award for 2003

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